Religious Studies (REL ST)

201 Religion and Contemporary Culture (3) Contemporary science and literature considered in their impact upon the relevance for religion in the 20th century. A study of such concepts as human nature, alienation, commitment, illusion, and hope.

301 Major Religions of the World (3) A survey of the history and philosophy of major living religions: Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Zoroastrianism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. (Same as Phil 301)

306 Religion and Society (3) Interrelationships of society, culture, and religion. Prereq: Soc 201. (Same as Anthro 306 and Soc 306)

320 Traces of God (3) An analysis of the contemporary question of the existence and nature of God and the relevance to that question of experience, faith, revelation, mysticism, proofs, history, relationships, and creativity. Also an exploration of the relation of God and the World in terms of creation/evolution, time/eternity, and culture/values. Position paper required. (Same as Phil 320)

340 Death, Suffering, and Evil (3) A study of the essential limits and boundary situations of life, particularly the dark shadows of death, suffering, and evil. Special attention given to an investigation of the possible meaningfulness of these limits and their value for authentic life. Other considerations include: suicide, abortion, war, crime, punishment, illness, insanity, perversion, inequality, waste. Position paper required. (Same of Phil 340)

350 The Hebrew-Jewish Scriptures (3) A study of the religious ideas, history, literature, and theology of the Hebrew-Jewish Scriptures. Some attention to principles of interpretation and critical issues.

360 The Christian Scriptures (3) A study of the religious ideas, history, literature, and theology of the New Testament. Some attention to principles of interpretation and critical issues.


390 Topics in the Philosophy and History of Religion (3) Intensive coverage of issues in the philosophy of religion (such as the theistic attributes, theistic proofs, religious language) or in the history of religion (such as non-Western religious traditions, eras of reform, the history of interpretation). Student should consult the department for details on topics to be offered any given year. Course may be repeated with total credits not to exceed six (6) hours. (Same as Phil 390)




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