UTM RSS Feedhttp://www.utm.edu/_imgs/154x154-UTM-Logo.jpgUTM RSS Feedhttp://www.utm.eduhttp://www.utm.eduThis is the RSS Feed for UTM Headlines.en-us<![CDATA[Dr. David Coffey presents "More Than Volunteers: Tennessee and the War of 1812"]]>MARTIN, Tenn., Sept. 19, 2014 – TENNESSEE AND THE WAR OF 1812 – UT Martin history professor David Coffey (pictured) presented “More Than Volunteers: Tennessee and the War of 1812” on Sept. 18 in the J. Houston Gordon Museum’s reading room located at the university’s Paul Meek Library. Coffey explained the reasons for the war and its significance at the time for Tennessee. He also discussed how the war helped to position Andrew Jackson as a national political figure. The Tennessee State Museum’s traveling exhibition, “Becoming the Volunteer State: Tennessee in the War of 1812,” is on view through Oct. 31 in the museum.### ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=277&month=09&day=19&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=277&month=09&day=19&year=2014Fri, 19 Sep 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[UT Executive Vice President David Millhorn highlights partnerships at rural business symposium]]> MARTIN, Tenn. — Partnerships are important to Dr. David Millhorn. The University of Tennessee executive vice president highlighted key partnerships that are promoting economic development in Tennessee as keynote speaker for the “Innovating for Profit: Building Rural Businesses from the Ground Up” symposium held Wednesday in UT Martin’s Boling University Center. The UT Martin College of Agriculture and Applied Sciences, The Mid-South School of Advanced Agricultural Lending, the Horace and Sara Dunagan Chair of Excellence in Banking and the Gill Parker Chair of Excellence in Agriculture, both at UT Martin, and the NextFarm Agricultural Innovation Accelerator, sponsored the symposium. In addition to Millhorn’s presentation, the symposium also featured a panel discussion of regional agriculture-based business leaders speaking on building businesses from the ground up. Participating in the panel were Jimmy Tosh of Tosh Farms, Kelley Powers of Final Flight and Powers Farms, Chuck Doss of INCO Irrigation Systems, M.J. Anderson of The Andersons, Inc., and Neil Mylet of LoadOut Technologies. Millhorn, who also serves as president of the UT Research Foundation, began his comments by noting UT’s three-part mission to educate, discover and connect, saying the university is expected to do all three very well “in addition to running a first-class sports program,” which drew some audience laughter. “So it’s a very complex organization, much more complex I would think than running a Fortune 500 company. … ” The university includes campuses at Knoxville, Chattanooga and Martin, the Health Science Center in Memphis, and the Space Institute at Tullahoma. UT also includes two statewide institutes – the Institute of Agriculture and the Institute for Public Service. Those associated with UT include approximately 50,000 undergraduate, graduate and professional students statewide, 12,000 employees statewide, including about 4,000 faculty, and an annual budget that exceeds $2 billion. “Probably, your lawyer, your doctor, your dentist are UT graduates,” he said. “Most importantly, we’re fully committed to the people of the state of Tennessee. …” Millhorn added. “We want to be engaged with you and make sure that we’re doing the best we can. “And we fully believe in partnerships. If you look at the university right now versus what it was 10, 12, 15 years ago, I would say the biggest difference are our partnerships. We have really tremendous partners because we can’t do it all. We need partners.”Some of those partners include the Oak Ridge National Laboratory managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy, DuPont in UT’s biofuels research efforts, and the state of Tennessee in biofuels and the West Tennessee Solar Farm in Haywood County. He also included the UT Research Foundation, which is a not-for-profit organization that manages the university’s intellectual property, technology transfer and small startup companies being developed by the university. UT’s partnerships and investments for Tennessee take on added significance in the state’s changing budget climate. He described the university’s budget in thirds: state appropriations, tuition, and grants and contracts. State appropriations and tuition are unrestricted and can be spent in different ways. Grants and contracts are restricted for specific uses and include overhead. “But, as we grow, the budget has to grow, and we’re in a situation where the state appropriations (are) not going to grow … so we have to become innovators,” he said. “We have to ourselves bring in money.” Faculty members who pursue grant money bring in a large portion of restricted funds, he said. Speaking to partnerships, “Our biggest partner and one that we have used to grow our research portfolio the most is the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.” In 2000, UT became laboratory manager for the DOE and sets annual goals and objectives for the lab. If those are met, the university receives a management fee. The lab brings in money through research grants and contracts, not appropriations. The workforce includes 900-1,000 Ph.Ds, several hundred students and an annual budget of $1.4 billion that has to be renewed each year through competition. Millhorn noted that UT’s research program is small compared to other universities, so he has to leverage opportunities to grow the program, such as making joint appointments; there are more than 170 faculty members appointed to both UT and ORNL. Last year, these faculty members brought in more than $40 million in grants. The university doesn’t have to pay these joint appointments but benefits from the grant money that enhances UT research. “And I can tell you that having that lab next to us gives us a opportunity that very few universities have.”Four UT buildings have been built at ORNL that house “joint institutes” in computer science, biological science and neutron science. He noted that UT campuses are the “biggest origin of our intellectual property” and added, “Our intellectual property portfolio continues to grow and grow with not only quantity but quality as well.”Among other partnerships, Millhorn highlighted what he described as a “game changer” in the Cherokee Farm Innovation Campus in Knoxville, which is devoted to private sector partnerships. All roads and utilities are complete, and construction on the Joint Institute of Advanced Materials has begun. Fifteen 150,000-square-foot buildings each will be built out over the next 10 years. “It (Cherokee Farm) will change the perception of the University of Tennessee by people that come and visit with us.”The UT Research Foundation is a private 501(c)(3) corporation for which Millhorn has served as president since January 2014. “Its major responsibility is to handle, protect our intellectual property, to transfer that intellectual property into value and to market that and look for people to license the intellectual property,” he said. “Or, in certain circumstances, we’ll start our own companies.” The UTRF has offices in Memphis and Knoxville, with the Memphis office responsible for the Martin campus. In 2009, the UTRF was creating about 80 intellectual property discovery disclosures annually. “The last three years, we’ve doubled that,” he said, adding, “It’s a way we can create new revenue streams into the university.” The UTRF has also generated 87 patent applications and a business incubator full of small companies. “We’re here to serve you. We’re here to serve others and to make this really work.”One of the companies created by the UTRF is Genera Energy in Vonore, a company that is now totally private. The company was created with a large state of Tennessee grant, but DuPont soon became a partner in a program to produce fuel from biomass. “We solved the technical problems of taking switchgrass, extracting the sugars, and converting those sugars into ethanol,” Millhorn said. “We can do that now rather efficiently. In fact, our whole university flex-fuel fleet runs on ethanol that we make.” The first bio-refinery that uses cellulose is being completed in Iowa and will use technology developed in Vonore. “DuPont has moved 75 of their scientists there from Wilmington (Delaware). They are committed for the long run as are we.” He added, “Anything you can do with a barrel of crude oil, we can do with biomass. Anything.” He sees this technology bringing economic development opportunities to rural Tennessee communities. Genera Energy has also spun off a company called TennEra, which uses the same biomass but not to produce fuel. Plastic bottles and paper are two products in development, and with a patent recently filed on the paper-production process, the potential exists to someday generate millions of dollars from producing these products. “You know, there are some universities out there that generate $50 to $100 million off their IP (intellectual property). That’s a lot of money. We can do it. … And we’ll provide, I think, the state with revenue that will be extremely important.”He also talked about the solar farm that was completed two years ago in Haywood County. Then Gov. Phil Bredesen wanted the farm built along the interstate so that people would see it, and an agreement is in place for TVA to purchase the power produced. A combination welcome-and-information center is being built at the site to show how solar energy is produced that will include an interactive play station for school groups to use. “So what makes UT different from any other college in this state?” Millhorn asked the audience. “One is our mission. Our mission is towards the people. Two is graduate education. We graduate more people with advance degrees than anyone else, and this is an area that we’ve got to make even better.” “The university is in fine shape. It’s doing really well. I think that the future is bright,” he added. “I think that it’s important that we have first-class partners and we be a first-class partner to the state.” ###PHOTO CAPTION – Dr. David Millhorn, University of Tennessee executive vice president and president of the UT Research Foundation, was keynote speaker for the “Innovating for Profit: Building Rural Businesses from the Ground Up” symposium held Wednesday, Sept. 17, in UT Martin’s Boling University Center. ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=276&month=09&day=18&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=276&month=09&day=18&year=2014Thu, 18 Sep 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[UT Martin fall enrollment tops 7,000; freshman class has record average ACT score]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=275&month=09&day=17&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=275&month=09&day=17&year=2014Wed, 17 Sep 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[UT Martin Phi Kappa Phi chapter receives top award]]>MARTIN, Tenn. —The Phi Kappa Phi Chapter at the University of Tennessee at Martin has been named a 2013-14 Chapter of Excellence, the highest chapter award recognized by the National Honor Society. Chapter awards were presented at the 2014 Phi Kappa Phi Biennial Convention held Aug. 7-9 in St. Louis.Only 27 chapters out of more than 300 across the United States earned this honor. A chapter must meet high standards set by the association in areas such as officer training, awards, campus events, service projects, membership, publicity, communications and grant applications to become a Chapter of Excellence.Dr. Chris Hill, chapter secretary and associate professor of English, accepted the award at the convention. Dr. Elaine Harriss, professor of music, was chapter president for 2013-14, and Dr. Stephanie Kolitsch, professor of mathematics, is chapter president for 2014-15. The UT Martin chapter was founded in 1971 and is the society’s 127th chapter. To foster outstanding scholarship, the chapter annually sponsors two faculty lectures, honors outstanding freshmen and sophomores with certificates of recognition, and presents a Phi Kappa Phi scholarship award to the top senior. The chapter also nominates one student for a national Phi Kappa Phi graduate fellowship. ###PHOTO CAPTION – UT Martin’s chapter of Phi Kappa Phi was recognized as a Chapter of Excellence at the 2014 Convention of the National Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi. Chapter awards were presented at the 2014 Phi Kappa Phi Biennial Convention held Aug. 7-9 in St. Louis. Pictured are (l to r) Dr. Elaine Harriss, 2013-14 president, Dr. Chris Hill, 2013-2015 secretary, and Dr. Stephanie Kolitsch, 2014-15 president. ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=274&month=09&day=16&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=274&month=09&day=16&year=2014Tue, 16 Sep 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[UT Martin history professor to explore role of Tennesseans in War of 1812]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=273&month=09&day=13&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=273&month=09&day=13&year=2014Sat, 13 Sep 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[Dr. James Butler receives highest National FFA Organization award]]>MARTIN, Tenn. – The National FFA Organization has named Dr. James Butler, agricultural education professor at the University of Tennessee at Martin, a National VIP. The honor is the highest in the organization and recognizes Butler’s significant contributions and dedication to FFA and agricultural education. The FFA mission is to create a positive difference in the lives of students by developing leadership potential, personal growth and career success through agricultural education. “The VIP citation recognizes the dedicated individuals who contribute to the FFA mission of student success through their hard work and cooperation,” said the National FFA Organization CEO Dwight Armstrong in a news release. “Without such strong and outstanding commitment, FFA would not be able to help build strong character in its members, who in turn build strong families, communities and industries.”Butler has a 25-year association with the National FFA Organization. During this time, he has served as a national proficiency judge and a national career development event judge. For the past 12 years, he has served as the co-coordinator for the national meats evaluation and technology career development event.He has received the honorary state FFA degree and the Tennessee VIP Association VIP award. Butler has also served as a member of the career and technical education state staff in Tennessee and is a member of the Tennessee FFA Board of Directors and technical education state staff in Tennessee. Butler is the collegiate FFA board advisor and coordinates regional and state FFA career development events in livestock, equine and vet science. The National FFA Organization provides leadership, personal growth and career success training through agricultural education to almost 580,000 student members in grades seven through 12 who belong to one of 7,570 local FFA chapters throughout the U.S., Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. ### ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=272&month=09&day=12&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=272&month=09&day=12&year=2014Fri, 12 Sep 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[Newly upgraded Barnes & Noble College Bookstore and Sodexo Skyhawk Dining Hall officially unveiled]]> MARTIN, Tenn. — New surroundings, expanded choices and cool places to spend time. All were officially unveiled Thursday as the University of Tennessee at Martin celebrated the grand re-opening of two widely used areas on the main campus. A 10:30 a.m. ceremony in the Boling University Center showcased the newly upgraded Barnes & Noble College Bookstore and Sodexo Skyhawk Dining Hall. Barnes & Noble committed $350,000 to the bookstore’s relocation to the university center’s first floor, while Sodexo made a $3.25 million investment in the dining services area.John Abel, Boling University Center interim director, emceed the program leading up to a ribbon cutting that was held on the first-floor hallway entrance leading to both the bookstore and dining services. “Both (projects) have been a long time coming,” Abel said, who welcomed the crowd that included Barnes & Noble and Sodexo representatives. Abel said that both projects involved student input throughout and were completed almost simultaneously in eight months. SGA President John Domanski, of Dickson, described the changes as “something that we have needed.” He added, “I think it’s safe to say that everyone I’ve talked to likes the new areas.” The Barnes & Noble College Bookstore began moving spring semester from its longtime second-floor location in the Boling University Center. With the move, the bookstore increased the amount of merchandise and textbooks, but appearances are deceiving as the new space is similar in size to the former location. “The floor space is actually not a huge difference in square footage,” said bookstore manager Steven Sanchez in an earlier interview. “The difference comes from the layout. Upstairs the store was long and straight. “Now we have a better layout with a better experience for everyone. We also can handle crowds for our back-to-school times a lot better now, too.” Sanchez is especially pleased with the bookstore’s new combination study and leisure area called The POD, which is located in the store’s book sales area. “Students can come in and watch TV between classes,” Sanchez said. “We have a table and chairs for people to work on schoolwork with a dry erase board behind it. We also have charging stations for anyone to come charge their phones, tablets, computers – whatever they might need.” “I like it (the new bookstore) a lot,” said Matthew Morgan, a freshman engineering major from Clinton, Ky. “I mean it’s all wide open, and you can easily find stuff.” He also likes the textbooks located separately from other merchandise. Bailee Barrett, a freshman chemistry major from Smyrna, has shopped the old and new bookstore. “It’s awesome,” she said of the new location. “It’s a lot bigger, and there’s a lot more … selection of items for class and for apparel.” Across the hall from the bookstore is the renovated dining hall and new coffee shop, The Hanger, which serves Starbucks Coffee. The Sodexo Skyhawk Dining Hall has a larger seating capacity and new dining options, including the 360 Degrees grill, Magellan international food option and an Italian food choice called Bella Trattoria. Staple dining options include the salad bar, now called Fresh From the Fields, the hot plate option called Daily Dish, the Basic Kneads sandwich station, and the Ignite Grill. Desserts can be found near each food station, and soda fountains are in three different locations. Jesse Koweleski, UT Martin Sodexo Dining Services promotions coordinator, is a senior communications major from McEwen. Koweleski, who has earned two years of professional experience working with Sodexo, has seen the area’s transformation firsthand. Work on the dining hall began the day after May graduation, and meals were served starting in mid-August when athletes returned to campus, he said. “Pretty much if you look at it, every single thing from the spoon, the fork, the knife, the plate, is brand new. All of the equipment, brand new. Everything is new,” Koweleski said in an earlier interview. As for reaction to the changes, “It’s almost been a complete shock. … All the reactions of the students, some of the faculty as well, and then even some community members, they absolutely love it.” The dining hall is open to the public, and brunch is served on the first Sunday of each month. “I like it,” said Morgan Threadgill, a freshman nursing major from Lexington. “I mean there’s a lot of choices, and it (the food) doesn’t get old, because there’s so many different choices.”Heath Simpson, a senior agriculture major from Somerville has experienced both the former and newly remodeled dining hall. He admits to being a bit surprised when he first saw the changes.“Well I know my first reaction when I walked in here from coming back from summer was kind of like, ‘Whoa, where is everything?’ But after you walk around and figure stuff out it’s kind of nice,” Simpson said. ###PHOTO CAPTION – A 10:30 a.m. ceremony Thursday, Sept. 11, in UT Martin’s Boling University Center, showcased the newly upgraded Barnes & Noble College Bookstore and Sodexo Skyhawk Dining Hall. Ready to cut ribbon following the ceremony were (l to r) John Abel, Boling University Center interim director; Steven Sanchez, Barnes & Noble College Bookstore manager; John Domanski, UT Martin SGA president; Dr. Tom Rakes, UT Martin chancellor; and Benjamin Long, UT Martin Sodexo Dining Services general manager. ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=271&month=09&day=11&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=271&month=09&day=11&year=2014Thu, 11 Sep 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[Grand Re-Opening set Thursday, Sept. 11, for newly remodeled UT Martin dining hall and bookstore]]> MARTIN, Tenn. — The University of Tennessee at Martin will celebrate the grand re-opening Thursday of two widely used areas on the main campus. A 10:30 a.m. ceremony will officially recognize the newly upgraded Barnes & Noble College Bookstore and Sodexo Skyhawk Dining Hall. The ceremony will take place in the first-floor lobby between the dining hall and bookstore. The university community and public are invited to attend. Beginning during the spring 2014 semester, the Barnes & Noble College Bookstore began moving from its longtime second-floor location in the Boling University Center. Now on the first floor, the bookstore has expanded and increased the amount of merchandise and textbooks. New to the store is a study area called the POD. More about the bookstore is available at http://utm.bncollege.com/. Across the hall from the bookstore is the newly renovated dining hall and brand new coffee shop, The Hanger, which serves Starbucks Coffee. The Sodexo Skyhawk Dining Hall has a larger seating capacity and new dining options that include the 360 Degrees grill, Magellan international food option and an Italian food option, Bella Trattoria. Staple dining options include the salad bar, now called Fresh From the Fields, the hot plate option called Daily Dish, the Basic Kneads sandwich station, and the Ignite Grill. Desserts can be found near each food station, and soda fountains are placed in three different locations. To celebrate the grand re-opening ceremony, special dining hall pricing is available through Friday, Sept. 12, with lunch costing $5 and dinner costing $7. For more information about UT Martin Dining Services, visit https://utm.sodexomyway.com/. ###PHOTO CAPTION – The newly remodeled Sodexo Skyhawk Dining Hall at UT Martin reopened with the start of fall semester classes. A grand re-opening of the dining hall and the university’s Barnes & Noble College Bookstore, also expanded and remodeled, will be held at 10:30 a.m. on the first floor of the Boling University Center. The public is invited. ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=268&month=09&day=09&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=268&month=09&day=09&year=2014Tue, 09 Sep 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[UT Martin continues top-tier U.S. News ranking; named 'Best in the Southeast' by The Princeton Review]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=269&month=09&day=09&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=269&month=09&day=09&year=2014Tue, 09 Sep 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[UT Martin awarded equipment through Syracuse University to benefit post-9/11 veterans]]>http://vets.syr.edu/employment/vctp-learning-paths/. The computer and headset will be located in Clement Hall, accessible through the Student Services and Success Mentoring Center. Registration is currently open for the seminars launching in January 2015. Those interested can apply at http://vets.syr.edu/VCTPLaptopUserApp, or persons can e-mail Dr. Alice-Catherine Carls at accarls@utm.edu. ### ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=270&month=09&day=09&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=270&month=09&day=09&year=2014Tue, 09 Sep 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[UT Martin welcomes new faculty and administrative staff]]>UT Martin welcomes new faculty and administrative staff – New UT Martin faculty and administrative staff members were welcomed to the university at a dinner hosted Sept. 4 by Drs. Tom and Glenda Rakes at the Dunagan Alumni Center. Those attending, with the area in which each works noted in parentheses, were (front row-l to r): Dr. Anderson Starling (Accounting, Finance, Economics and Political Science), Katie Smith (Student Organizations), Lora McDonald (Athletics-Administration), Steven Sanchez (Barnes & Noble Bookstore), Dr. Cindy Boyles (Behavioral Sciences), Amy Fenning (Tennessee Intensive English Program), LaQuita Morris (Mathematics and Statistics), Caroline Ideus (Tennessee Intensive English Program), Amy Richards (Family and Consumer Sciences), Dr. Hyungju Hur (History and Philosophy); (middle row-l to r) Master Sgt. James Postal (Military Science), Andrew Joannides (Athletics-Administration), Dr. Emalee Buttrey (Agriculture, Geoscience and Natural Resources), Rick Guarno (Baseball), Monty Taylor (Tennessee Intensive English Program), Josh Greer (Health and Human Performance), Kavitha Nambisan (Tennessee Intensive English Program), Rebecca Searle (Tennessee Intensive English Program), Jennifer Cooper (Finance and Administration), Kayce Beam (Jackson Center), Dr. Carl Libis (Mathematics and Statistics), Laura Taylor (Health and Human Performance); (back row-l to r) Rick Robinson (Baseball), Brian Carroll (Family and Consumer Sciences), John Aiken (Men’s Basketball), Heath Schroyer (Men’s Basketball), Dr. Aaron Rowland (Behavioral Sciences), Dr. Ty Perry (Accounting, Finance, Economics and Political Science), Julio Freire (Athletics-Administration) and Dr. Justin Martin (Behavioral Sciences). Attending the dinner but not pictured was Sarah Hendricks (Behavioral Sciences). Unable to attend the dinner were Capt. Troy Shoemaker (Military Science), Dr. Will Taeuk Kang (Management, Marketing and Information Systems), Dr. Morgan Miles (Tom E. Hendrix Chair of Excellence), Cassondra Burks (Nursing), Dr. Hyonson Hwang (Biological Sciences), Dr. Robert Niedzialomski (Mathematics and Statistics), John Bond (Football), Justin Rascati (Football), Charles Covington (Finance and Administration), Jared Anderson (Greek Life) and Karen White (Paul Meek Library). ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=267&month=09&day=08&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=267&month=09&day=08&year=2014Mon, 08 Sep 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[Business innovation symposium set for Sept. 17 at UT Martin]]>http://ntecconnect.com/. ### ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=265&month=09&day=06&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=265&month=09&day=06&year=2014Sat, 06 Sep 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[WestStar Leadership Program accepting applications for 2015 class]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/weststar/. The application deadline is Oct. 15. Anyone can apply to participate in the program, and nominations are accepted but not required. Class members will be competitively selected to participate in the 2015 program.The WestStar program consists of eight specially designed seminar programs addressing contemporary major issues important to West Tennessee’s development. Each seminar takes place over one-and-a-half days. The program begins Dec. 11 with an opening one-day retreat and ends June 18, 2015, with an evening graduation ceremony.The WestStar mission is to identify, encourage and equip community-minded people who want to become more involved, want to help West Tennessee become a better place and are willing to accept assertive and dynamic leadership roles.Participants learn new leadership skills and develop strategies for assisting communities in solving problems and maximizing potential. Participants also become part of a growing network of other leaders who, through mutual support and assistance, shape West Tennessee’s future.### ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=266&month=09&day=06&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=266&month=09&day=06&year=2014Sat, 06 Sep 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[War of 1812 exhibit explores now Tennessee became known as 'The Volunteer State']]> MARTIN, Tenn. — The War of 1812 was a defining moment in Tennessee’s history, thrusting the state into the spotlight of American political and military history. Many Tennesseans emerged as important American figures, including Andrew Jackson, David Crockett, Sam Houston, Edmund Gaines (Act of Congress Medal winner) and Sequoyah. To explore this long overlooked war, the University of Tennessee at Martin’s J. Houston Gordon Museum presents the Tennessee State Museum’s traveling exhibition “Becoming the Volunteer State: Tennessee in the War of 1812.” The museum is located in the Paul Meek Library, and the exhibit is on view through Oct. 31.The Tennessee State Museum collaborated with the Tennessee War of 1812 Bicentennial Commission on organizing the exhibition. The traveling exhibit is funded in part by a grant from Humanities Tennessee, an independent affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. The War of 1812, fought against Great Britain, culminated in the Battle of New Orleans in January 1815. The American public often overlooks this conflict, but it was incredibly important in establishing the American national identity. Some noted historians believe that it was the “second American Revolution,” which marked true independence from Britain for the United States.The war in the South was particularly a Tennessee war, waged predominately by Tennessee militia, volunteers or regular army units raised in the state. When the British threatened the Gulf Coast, Tennesseans contributed to the defeat of the Red Sticks at Horseshoe Bend and the British at New Orleans. Andrew Jackson’s victory at the Battle of New Orleans propelled him to the White House and established Tennessee at the forefront of American politics. So many Tennesseans volunteered for service that the state soon began to be known by its now-famous nickname, the “Volunteer State.” On display are period artifacts from the era, such as a 7th US infantry soldier’s uniform and a book that was on the USS Constitution, swords, muskets, and other weapons owned by those who fought in the war, as well as a broad variety of documentary art, maps and illustrations that have been selected to recreate a flavor of the times. In conjunction with the exhibit, the Gordon Museum will present a talk by Dr. David Coffey at 3 p.m. on September 18. Coffey is a professor and chair of the UT Martin Department of History and Philosophy. For more information on museum hours, directions and parking locations, visit the library’s website at http://www.utm.edu/library.php or call Samuel Richardson or Karen Elmore at 731-881-7094. ###PHOTO CAPTION – The Tennessee State Museum’s traveling exhibition, “Becoming the Volunteer State: Tennessee in the War of 1812,” includes several artifacts from this important time in the state’s history. In the display case are a flintlock pistol belonging to Samuel G. Smith, the Congressional Medal of Gen. Edmund Gaines, a piece of Fort Barrancas, a book from the USS Constitution and other items. The exhibit is on view through Oct. 31 in UT Martin’s J. Houston Gordon Museum, located in the Paul Meek Library. ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=262&month=09&day=04&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=262&month=09&day=04&year=2014Thu, 04 Sep 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[War of 1812 exhibit explores how Tennessee became known as 'The Volunteer State']]> MARTIN, Tenn. — The War of 1812 was a defining moment in Tennessee’s history, thrusting the state into the spotlight of American political and military history. Many Tennesseans emerged as important American figures, including Andrew Jackson, David Crockett, Sam Houston, Edmund Gaines (Act of Congress Medal winner) and Sequoyah. To explore this long overlooked war, the University of Tennessee at Martin’s J. Houston Gordon Museum presents the Tennessee State Museum’s traveling exhibition “Becoming the Volunteer State: Tennessee in the War of 1812.” The museum is located in the Paul Meek Library, and the exhibit is on view through Oct. 31.The Tennessee State Museum collaborated with the Tennessee War of 1812 Bicentennial Commission on organizing the exhibition. The traveling exhibit is funded in part by a grant from Humanities Tennessee, an independent affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. The War of 1812, fought against Great Britain, culminated in the Battle of New Orleans in January 1815. The American public often overlooks this conflict, but it was incredibly important in establishing the American national identity. Some noted historians believe that it was the “second American Revolution,” which marked true independence from Britain for the United States.The war in the South was particularly a Tennessee war, waged predominately by Tennessee militia, volunteers or regular army units raised in the state. When the British threatened the Gulf Coast, Tennesseans contributed to the defeat of the Red Sticks at Horseshoe Bend and the British at New Orleans. Andrew Jackson’s victory at the Battle of New Orleans propelled him to the White House and established Tennessee at the forefront of American politics. So many Tennesseans volunteered for service that the state soon began to be known by its now-famous nickname, the “Volunteer State.” On display are period artifacts from the era, such as a 7th US infantry soldier’s uniform and a book that was on the USS Constitution, swords, muskets, and other weapons owned by those who fought in the war, as well as a broad variety of documentary art, maps and illustrations that have been selected to recreate a flavor of the times. In conjunction with the exhibit, the Gordon Museum will present a talk by Dr. David Coffey at 3 p.m. on September 18. Coffey is a professor and chair of the UT Martin Department of History and Philosophy. For more information on museum hours, directions and parking locations, visit the library’s website at http://www.utm.edu/library.php or call Samuel Richardson or Karen Elmore at 731-881-7094. ###PHOTO CAPTION – The Tennessee State Museum’s traveling exhibition, “Becoming the Volunteer State: Tennessee in the War of 1812,” includes several artifacts from this important time in the state’s history. In the display case are a flintlock pistol belonging to Samuel G. Smith, the Congressional Medal of Gen. Edmund Gaines, a piece of Fort Barrancas, a book from the USS Constitution and other items. The exhibit is on view through Oct. 31 in UT Martin’s J. Houston Gordon Museum, located in the Paul Meek Library. ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=263&month=09&day=04&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=263&month=09&day=04&year=2014Thu, 04 Sep 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[Alan Youngerman named UT Martin McNairy County/Selmer Center director]]>MARTIN, Tenn. – Alan Youngerman, most recently district executive for the Boy Scouts of America, is the new director of the UT Martin McNairy County Center/Selmer. He succeeds Deidra Beene who died in March following a long illness. She had served as center director since 2001. Youngerman began his new duties Sept. 2.“I’ve always loved education,” Youngerman said of his appointment. “I’d like to see the university continue and expand its successes here.” He added that his long and varied business background would help him move the center forward. Before his position with the Boy Scouts, Youngerman was co-owner and vice president of Stan’s Home Center Inc. in Jackson and the Home Center Inc. in Lexington and Henderson. He was previously associated with the McNairy County/Selmer Center from 2009-11 as an adjunct faculty member teaching geology.Youngerman holds an associate degree in physical chemistry from Jackson State Community College, a bachelor’s degree in earth science from Tennessee Technological University in Cookeville and a master’s degree with a major in economic geology from the University of Nevada, Reno - Mackay School of Mines.Youngerman and his wife, Elizabeth, have two children and live in Selmer.UT Martin opened the McNairy County/Selmer Center in cooperation with McNairy County and the city of Selmer. The university began offering lower-division courses at the center in summer 1998. In fall 2004, the center began offering courses leading to the Education K-6 degree. Then in fall 2008, the center offered courses leading to bachelor’s degrees in history and social work. Four new classrooms were completed in fall 2009.In addition to previous offerings, a major in criminal justice is now available, and a major in psychology is new for this fall semester. The center also offers a full rotation plan of general-education courses, upper-division courses and the Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies degree.Also available are non-credit classes, and the center can design training curriculums to meet the individual needs of local business and industry. The UT Martin Office of Extended Campus and Online Studies is the university’s administrative reporting channel for the center. ### ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=264&month=09&day=04&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=264&month=09&day=04&year=2014Thu, 04 Sep 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[New West Tennessee Healtcare Foundation Nursing wing officially opens at UT Martin Parsons Center]]>MARTIN, Tenn. – Jessica Brownyard has a lot to say about the UT Martin Parsons Center. Brownyard spoke at the July 2013 announcement of the center’s new West Tennessee Healthcare Foundation Nursing Wing. On Thursday, Aug. 28, she spoke again at a ribbon-cutting ceremony that officially opened the expansion. Sometime in the future, she can say that she’s among the first to graduate from the center’s new Bachelor of Science in Nursing program housed in the facility. Brownyard joined University of Tennessee President Joe DiPietro, UT Martin Chancellor Tom Rakes, Jim and Janet Ayers of the Ayers Foundation, local and state elected officials and others to celebrate the expansion’s completion. The 30-minute program later moved from the Parsons Center’s main entrance to the new nursing wing, complete with its own entrance and a large water fountain to welcome students and visitors. Ribbon was cut at the entrance, and a reception and tours followed. The official opening of the wing came as the Parsons Center has reached an all-time enrollment record of 325 students for fall semester. Dr. Kelli Deere, center director, welcomed the overflow crowd and recognized the partnership among the UT Martin Parsons Center, the West Tennessee Healthcare Foundation and the state of Tennessee for making the expansion possible. She specifically thanked Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam and the Tennessee General Assembly for supporting the project, which was completed by TLM Associates, of Jackson, and Quinn Construction, of Parsons. Initial funding for the expansion was included in the 2013-14 state budget, and a $1 million appropriation was made to build a 10,000-square-foot addition to the center. The project received added support when the West Tennessee Healthcare Foundation also made a $1 million commitment to the project. The addition includes classrooms, a skills laboratory and a high-fidelity computerized simulation laboratory.UT Martin Chancellor Tom Rakes also expressed appreciation to all who made the project possible. He reminded the audience that the university is bringing a high-quality BSN program to the center as he told of 2014 nursing graduates achieving a 100 percent pass rate on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses. “We feel fortunate to partner with this community, this region of the state, certainly with West Tennessee Healthcare,” Rakes said of the project. “We appreciate the relationships with our legislators, and we don\'t take it for granted because it doesn\'t happen automatically.” UT President Joe DiPietro compared the new nursing wing to the time when he and other University of Illinois veterinary science faculty members moved to a new large animal hospital. He recalled that the move “changed how we felt about ourselves. It changed how we were able to train our students. It changed the spirit of the organization to focus on getting even better.” He sees the expansion having the same potential impact for the Parsons Center. DiPietro kept the focus on students and introduced Brownyard, who was accepted to begin the nursing program this fall. “I never thought that in my wildest dreams that I would get to graduate from the UT Martin Parsons Center,” Brownyard said. “And now I will get to be one of the first ever to graduate from the new BSN program.” She thanked Jim and Janet Ayers and the Ayers Foundation for helping her “through every single semester of college” and added, “This new addition gives so many students the hope that one day that they can graduate while still staying close to home and saving a little bit of money.” Harbert Alexander Jr., chairman of the West Tennessee Healthcare Foundation board, talked about the nursing program’s future impact on the region. He also acknowledged the Ayers for challenging the West Tennessee Healthcare Foundation “to step up and commit to the largest project that we’ve ever tried to accomplish.”A surprise ending to the program came when Jo Ann Ayers Lynn, sister of Jim Ayers, and Chancellor Tom Rakes unveiled a bust of the businessman and philanthropist. “This is a wonderful honor that, I promise you, I don’t deserve,” a grateful Ayers said. Janet Ayers followed her husband to the podium a short time later and said, “Jim, you are deserving of a lot of attention and a lot of recognition, …” but added that one person can’t achieve things alone. “It is a whole community that comes together to make things like this (the Parsons Center) happen,” she said. ###PHOTO CAPTION: Ready to cut ribbon Aug. 28 for the new West Tennessee Healthcare Foundation Nursing Wing at the UT Martin Parsons Center are (l to r) Harbert Alexander Jr, chairman of West Tennessee Healthcare Foundation board; Dr. Tom Rakes, UT Martin chancellor; Dr. Kelli Deere, Parsons Center director, Dr. Joe DiPietro, UT president, and Janet and Jim Ayers of the Ayers Foundation. ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=255&month=08&day=29&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=255&month=08&day=29&year=2014Fri, 29 Aug 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[New West Tennessee Healtcare Foundation Nursing wing officially opens at UT Martin Parsons Center]]> MARTIN, Tenn. – Marching band directors appreciate the sights and sounds of a top performing drum line. Aiming to be the best they can be for football halftime performances and band competition season, the Huntingdon High School Band was among seven bands participating Aug. 23 in the 10th Annual Drum Line Tune-Up Day at the University of Tennessee at Martin. The event began at 8:30 a.m. in the Fine Arts Building’s band room, with the Huntingdon band closing out the day’s performances in its second year at the event. Other bands participating were Liberty Tech, Stewart County, South Gibson, Munford, McNairy Central, and Waverly Central. Guest artist Julie Davila presented a marching percussion clinic and also provided individual instruction. Jill Bonds directs the Huntingdon High School band. She is a Huntingdon High School graduate and in her third year at the school. Derek Cook is the band’s assistant director and is a UT Martin graduate. The band last won a state championship in 2005 and is coming off a third-place tie last November at the Division I State Marching Band Championship at Riverdale High School in Murfreesboro. The band’s 45 members are aiming even higher for 2014.“As a group, we have decided to set the bar high this year and keep our momentum going from last competition season,” Bond said in an e-mail interview. “So in terms of competition, our goal is to finish in the top two at the Tennessee Division I State Band Championship. That would mean we are making gains in terms of placement.” In addition to competition goals, Bonds wants the band to be “the leader of school spirit,” both for the student body and the community.Bonds’ major instrument is the clarinet, so having this kind of instruction available is important. “At Tune-Up Day, the students receive instant feedback and suggestions on how to improve technique,” she said. “Since it's often difficult for us to get a percussion instructor at every rehearsal due to budget and our location, the students leave Tune-Up Day with a wealth of knowledge and work on implementing it throughout the season.”Dr. Julie Hill created Drum Line Tune-Up Day in 2005 during her first year as a UT Martin faculty member. The associate professor of music and director of percussion studies saw the new event as a way to raise funds for her program and also reach out to high school bands in different communities. “Our program hosts events throughout the year that focus on world music, contemporary music, chamber music and more,” Hill said via e-mail, estimating that her students perform annually for more than 5,000 people. “But with so many high schools in Tennessee putting their entire fall focus into the marching band genre, it seemed only natural to include an education event focused on the marching percussion genre into our array of offerings to surrounding programs.”Interest in the event has grown so much that band directors contact Hill to participate. Seven bands are the maximum she can accommodate, and each receives personal attention. “Each program gets 50 minutes of individual instruction time and receives instant feedback on their technique, phrasing and musicality of their ensemble,” Hill said. “We also give them feedback on their percussion music for their fall marching band show, and we make suggestions that will hopefully give them a more successful and positive fall performance season.”Participating bands also receive bonus attention on top of the individual instruction. “Lastly, we actually help ‘tune up’ the groups by helping to fix any instrument or carrier problems they may have, as well as tune their drums if they need help with this,” Hill said. “Thus the name ‘Tune-Up Day’ has several different implications.”The other event highlight is instruction by Davila, adjunct instructor of percussion at Middle Tennessee State University. Davila also performs with Hill as a member of the Caixa Trio chamber percussion ensemble. Hill describes her as “one of the best rudimental players I know,” adding, “She is friendly and efficient and can really help groups tremendously in a short amount of time. Students have a good time learning with her, and she provides the students and instructors with tools they can take back home and work on for years to come.”Marching Mustang band members talked about their band experiences in the percussion studio just before working with Davila. Emily Coleman, an eight grader who plays marimba, said that percussion sections are “good for keeping tempo, and they add extra dimension to the music.” She sees the Tune-Up Day as excellent preparation for the band. “It’s good for helping with technique and just getting your music better,” Coleman said. Ben Reiter, a senior percussionist, said that the Mustang football team has already taken notice of the band’s performance during the opening home game Aug. 22 with Obion County. “I mean, I was talking to one of my football player friends earlier on today, and he was saying that last night we were really helping pep the football team up and getting them excited and getting their adrenaline flowing so they could play a little bit better,” Reiter said. “That was just when we were in the stands, and some of them heard us out on the field, too, during halftime.” Band members share similar goals and optimism for what this edition of the Marching Mustangs can accomplish. “I definitely want to win the state this year or at least get above third,” Reiter said, who believes the band is capable of bettering last year’s finish. “Other than that, just do better with the music.” Darius Bills, a freshman who plays the snare drums for the pep band among other percussion duties, likes his experience so far and appreciates how fellow musicians have supported him in his first year. “My hopes are just like getting higher than we did last year and becoming better as a band, as a group.” All credit Jill Bonds for her leadership and ability to help the band reach its potential. “Ms. Bonds is great,” Coleman said. “She really helps out a lot, and she’s really patient, and she’s a very good instructor.” Bills added, “Actually, like she slows down and takes her time, and like even if she has to keep us over, maybe like 30 minutes or an hour after rehearsal, she will do that just to help us.” “I really like Ms. Bonds,” Reiter said. “ … She really cares about us, and she’s always looking for ways to help improve the band, like asking us if we need anything, like new sticks, or the woodwind instruments if they need new reeds or anything like that. She’s always making sure we have everything we need to be good.”Emily, Ben and Darius then joined their fellow band members in the band room as the final group to work with Davila. She demonstrated, encouraged and listened intently as she coached this important section of the Marching Mustangs to be the best it can be. With high school football halftime shows underway and competition season just ahead, this tune-up session put the finishing touches on many hard hours of practice for these seven high school bands. Each left UT Martin ready to take the field, entertain crowds and promote school spirit as only marching bands can do. ###PHOTO CAPTION – Emily Coleman receives personal instruction from Julie Davila (right) during the 10th Annual Drum Line Tune-Up Day on Aug. 23 at UT Martin. ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=257&month=08&day=29&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=257&month=08&day=29&year=2014Fri, 29 Aug 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[Huntingdon High School marching band tunes up at drum-lin workshop]]> MARTIN, Tenn. – Marching band directors appreciate the sights and sounds of a top performing drum line. Aiming to be the best they can be for football halftime performances and band competition season, the Huntingdon High School Band was among seven bands participating Aug. 23 in the 10th Annual Drum Line Tune-Up Day at the University of Tennessee at Martin. The event began at 8:30 a.m. in the Fine Arts Building’s band room, with the Huntingdon band closing out the day’s performances in its second year at the event. Other bands participating were Liberty Tech, Stewart County, South Gibson, Munford, McNairy Central, and Waverly Central. Guest artist Julie Davila presented a marching percussion clinic and also provided individual instruction. Jill Bonds directs the Huntingdon High School band. She is a Huntingdon High School graduate and in her third year at the school. Derek Cook is the band’s assistant director and is a UT Martin graduate. The band last won a state championship in 2005 and is coming off a third-place tie last November at the Division I State Marching Band Championship at Riverdale High School in Murfreesboro. The band’s 45 members are aiming even higher for 2014.“As a group, we have decided to set the bar high this year and keep our momentum going from last competition season,” Bond said in an e-mail interview. “So in terms of competition, our goal is to finish in the top two at the Tennessee Division I State Band Championship. That would mean we are making gains in terms of placement.” In addition to competition goals, Bonds wants the band to be “the leader of school spirit,” both for the student body and the community.Bonds’ major instrument is the clarinet, so having this kind of instruction available is important. “At Tune-Up Day, the students receive instant feedback and suggestions on how to improve technique,” she said. “Since it's often difficult for us to get a percussion instructor at every rehearsal due to budget and our location, the students leave Tune-Up Day with a wealth of knowledge and work on implementing it throughout the season.”Dr. Julie Hill created Drum Line Tune-Up Day in 2005 during her first year as a UT Martin faculty member. The associate professor of music and director of percussion studies saw the new event as a way to raise funds for her program and also reach out to high school bands in different communities. “Our program hosts events throughout the year that focus on world music, contemporary music, chamber music and more,” Hill said via e-mail, estimating that her students perform annually for more than 5,000 people. “But with so many high schools in Tennessee putting their entire fall focus into the marching band genre, it seemed only natural to include an education event focused on the marching percussion genre into our array of offerings to surrounding programs.”Interest in the event has grown so much that band directors contact Hill to participate. Seven bands are the maximum she can accommodate, and each receives personal attention. “Each program gets 50 minutes of individual instruction time and receives instant feedback on their technique, phrasing and musicality of their ensemble,” Hill said. “We also give them feedback on their percussion music for their fall marching band show, and we make suggestions that will hopefully give them a more successful and positive fall performance season.”Participating bands also receive bonus attention on top of the individual instruction. “Lastly, we actually help ‘tune up’ the groups by helping to fix any instrument or carrier problems they may have, as well as tune their drums if they need help with this,” Hill said. “Thus the name ‘Tune-Up Day’ has several different implications.”The other event highlight is instruction by Davila, adjunct instructor of percussion at Middle Tennessee State University. Davila also performs with Hill as a member of the Caixa Trio chamber percussion ensemble. Hill describes her as “one of the best rudimental players I know,” adding, “She is friendly and efficient and can really help groups tremendously in a short amount of time. Students have a good time learning with her, and she provides the students and instructors with tools they can take back home and work on for years to come.”Marching Mustang band members talked about their band experiences in the percussion studio just before working with Davila. Emily Coleman, an eight grader who plays marimba, said that percussion sections are “good for keeping tempo, and they add extra dimension to the music.” She sees the Tune-Up Day as excellent preparation for the band. “It’s good for helping with technique and just getting your music better,” Coleman said. Ben Reiter, a senior percussionist, said that the Mustang football team has already taken notice of the band’s performance during the opening home game Aug. 22 with Obion County. “I mean, I was talking to one of my football player friends earlier on today, and he was saying that last night we were really helping pep the football team up and getting them excited and getting their adrenaline flowing so they could play a little bit better,” Reiter said. “That was just when we were in the stands, and some of them heard us out on the field, too, during halftime.” Band members share similar goals and optimism for what this edition of the Marching Mustangs can accomplish. “I definitely want to win the state this year or at least get above third,” Reiter said, who believes the band is capable of bettering last year’s finish. “Other than that, just do better with the music.” Darius Bills, a freshman who plays the snare drums for the pep band among other percussion duties, likes his experience so far and appreciates how fellow musicians have supported him in his first year. “My hopes are just like getting higher than we did last year and becoming better as a band, as a group.” All credit Jill Bonds for her leadership and ability to help the band reach its potential. “Ms. Bonds is great,” Coleman said. “She really helps out a lot, and she’s really patient, and she’s a very good instructor.” Bills added, “Actually, like she slows down and takes her time, and like even if she has to keep us over, maybe like 30 minutes or an hour after rehearsal, she will do that just to help us.” “I really like Ms. Bonds,” Reiter said. “ … She really cares about us, and she’s always looking for ways to help improve the band, like asking us if we need anything, like new sticks, or the woodwind instruments if they need new reeds or anything like that. She’s always making sure we have everything we need to be good.”Emily, Ben and Darius then joined their fellow band members in the band room as the final group to work with Davila. She demonstrated, encouraged and listened intently as she coached this important section of the Marching Mustangs to be the best it can be. With high school football halftime shows underway and competition season just ahead, this tune-up session put the finishing touches on many hard hours of practice for these seven high school bands. Each left UT Martin ready to take the field, entertain crowds and promote school spirit as only marching bands can do. ###PHOTO CAPTION – Emily Coleman receives personal instruction from Julie Davila (right) during the 10th Annual Drum Line Tune-Up Day on Aug. 23 at UT Martin. ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=258&month=08&day=29&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=258&month=08&day=29&year=2014Fri, 29 Aug 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[Huntingdon High School marching band tunes up at drum-line workshop]]> MARTIN, Tenn. – Marching band directors appreciate the sights and sounds of a top performing drum line. Aiming to be the best they can be for football halftime performances and band competition season, the Huntingdon High School Band was among seven bands participating Aug. 23 in the 10th Annual Drum Line Tune-Up Day at the University of Tennessee at Martin. The event began at 8:30 a.m. in the Fine Arts Building’s band room, with the Huntingdon band closing out the day’s performances in its second year at the event. Other bands participating were Liberty Tech, Stewart County, South Gibson, Munford, McNairy Central, and Waverly Central. Guest artist Julie Davila presented a marching percussion clinic and also provided individual instruction. Jill Bonds directs the Huntingdon High School band. She is a Huntingdon High School graduate and in her third year at the school. Derek Cook is the band’s assistant director and is a UT Martin graduate. The band last won a state championship in 2005 and is coming off a third-place tie last November at the Division I State Marching Band Championship at Riverdale High School in Murfreesboro. The band’s 45 members are aiming even higher for 2014.“As a group, we have decided to set the bar high this year and keep our momentum going from last competition season,” Bond said in an e-mail interview. “So in terms of competition, our goal is to finish in the top two at the Tennessee Division I State Band Championship. That would mean we are making gains in terms of placement.” In addition to competition goals, Bonds wants the band to be “the leader of school spirit,” both for the student body and the community.Bonds’ major instrument is the clarinet, so having this kind of instruction available is important. “At Tune-Up Day, the students receive instant feedback and suggestions on how to improve technique,” she said. “Since it's often difficult for us to get a percussion instructor at every rehearsal due to budget and our location, the students leave Tune-Up Day with a wealth of knowledge and work on implementing it throughout the season.”Dr. Julie Hill created Drum Line Tune-Up Day in 2005 during her first year as a UT Martin faculty member. The associate professor of music and director of percussion studies saw the new event as a way to raise funds for her program and also reach out to high school bands in different communities. “Our program hosts events throughout the year that focus on world music, contemporary music, chamber music and more,” Hill said via e-mail, estimating that her students perform annually for more than 5,000 people. “But with so many high schools in Tennessee putting their entire fall focus into the marching band genre, it seemed only natural to include an education event focused on the marching percussion genre into our array of offerings to surrounding programs.”Interest in the event has grown so much that band directors contact Hill to participate. Seven bands are the maximum she can accommodate, and each receives personal attention. “Each program gets 50 minutes of individual instruction time and receives instant feedback on their technique, phrasing and musicality of their ensemble,” Hill said. “We also give them feedback on their percussion music for their fall marching band show, and we make suggestions that will hopefully give them a more successful and positive fall performance season.”Participating bands also receive bonus attention on top of the individual instruction. “Lastly, we actually help ‘tune up’ the groups by helping to fix any instrument or carrier problems they may have, as well as tune their drums if they need help with this,” Hill said. “Thus the name ‘Tune-Up Day’ has several different implications.”The other event highlight is instruction by Davila, adjunct instructor of percussion at Middle Tennessee State University. Davila also performs with Hill as a member of the Caixa Trio chamber percussion ensemble. Hill describes her as “one of the best rudimental players I know,” adding, “She is friendly and efficient and can really help groups tremendously in a short amount of time. Students have a good time learning with her, and she provides the students and instructors with tools they can take back home and work on for years to come.”Marching Mustang band members talked about their band experiences in the percussion studio just before working with Davila. Emily Coleman, an eight grader who plays marimba, said that percussion sections are “good for keeping tempo, and they add extra dimension to the music.” She sees the Tune-Up Day as excellent preparation for the band. “It’s good for helping with technique and just getting your music better,” Coleman said. Ben Reiter, a senior percussionist, said that the Mustang football team has already taken notice of the band’s performance during the opening home game Aug. 22 with Obion County. “I mean, I was talking to one of my football player friends earlier on today, and he was saying that last night we were really helping pep the football team up and getting them excited and getting their adrenaline flowing so they could play a little bit better,” Reiter said. “That was just when we were in the stands, and some of them heard us out on the field, too, during halftime.” Band members share similar goals and optimism for what this edition of the Marching Mustangs can accomplish. “I definitely want to win the state this year or at least get above third,” Reiter said, who believes the band is capable of bettering last year’s finish. “Other than that, just do better with the music.” Darius Bills, a freshman who plays the snare drums for the pep band among other percussion duties, likes his experience so far and appreciates how fellow musicians have supported him in his first year. “My hopes are just like getting higher than we did last year and becoming better as a band, as a group.” All credit Jill Bonds for her leadership and ability to help the band reach its potential. “Ms. Bonds is great,” Coleman said. “She really helps out a lot, and she’s really patient, and she’s a very good instructor.” Bills added, “Actually, like she slows down and takes her time, and like even if she has to keep us over, maybe like 30 minutes or an hour after rehearsal, she will do that just to help us.” “I really like Ms. Bonds,” Reiter said. “ … She really cares about us, and she’s always looking for ways to help improve the band, like asking us if we need anything, like new sticks, or the woodwind instruments if they need new reeds or anything like that. She’s always making sure we have everything we need to be good.”Emily, Ben and Darius then joined their fellow band members in the band room as the final group to work with Davila. She demonstrated, encouraged and listened intently as she coached this important section of the Marching Mustangs to be the best it can be. With high school football halftime shows underway and competition season just ahead, this tune-up session put the finishing touches on many hard hours of practice for these seven high school bands. Each left UT Martin ready to take the field, entertain crowds and promote school spirit as only marching bands can do. ###PHOTO CAPTION – Emily Coleman receives personal instruction from Julie Davila (right) during the 10th Annual Drum Line Tune-Up Day on Aug. 23 at UT Martin. ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=259&month=08&day=29&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=259&month=08&day=29&year=2014Fri, 29 Aug 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[New West Tennessee Healthcare Foundation Nursing wing officially opens at UT Martin Parsons Center]]>MARTIN, Tenn. – Jessica Brownyard has a lot to say about the UT Martin Parsons Center. Brownyard spoke at the July 2013 announcement of the center’s new West Tennessee Healthcare Foundation Nursing Wing. On Thursday, Aug. 28, she spoke again at a ribbon-cutting ceremony that officially opened the expansion. Sometime in the future, she can say that she’s among the first to graduate from the center’s new Bachelor of Science in Nursing program housed in the facility. Brownyard joined University of Tennessee President Joe DiPietro, UT Martin Chancellor Tom Rakes, Jim and Janet Ayers of the Ayers Foundation, local and state elected officials and others to celebrate the expansion’s completion. The 30-minute program later moved from the Parsons Center’s main entrance to the new nursing wing, complete with its own entrance and a large water fountain to welcome students and visitors. Ribbon was cut at the entrance, and a reception and tours followed. The official opening of the wing came as the Parsons Center has reached an all-time enrollment record of 325 students for fall semester. Dr. Kelli Deere, center director, welcomed the overflow crowd and recognized the partnership among the UT Martin Parsons Center, the West Tennessee Healthcare Foundation and the state of Tennessee for making the expansion possible. She specifically thanked Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam and the Tennessee General Assembly for supporting the project, which was completed by TLM Associates, of Jackson, and Quinn Construction, of Parsons. Initial funding for the expansion was included in the 2013-14 state budget, and a $1 million appropriation was made to build a 10,000-square-foot addition to the center. The project received added support when the West Tennessee Healthcare Foundation also made a $1 million commitment to the project. The addition includes classrooms, a skills laboratory and a high-fidelity computerized simulation laboratory.UT Martin Chancellor Tom Rakes also expressed appreciation to all who made the project possible. He reminded the audience that the university is bringing a high-quality BSN program to the center as he told of 2014 nursing graduates achieving a 100 percent pass rate on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses. “We feel fortunate to partner with this community, this region of the state, certainly with West Tennessee Healthcare,” Rakes said of the project. “We appreciate the relationships with our legislators, and we don't take it for granted because it doesn't happen automatically.” UT President Joe DiPietro compared the new nursing wing to the time when he and other University of Illinois veterinary science faculty members moved to a new large animal hospital. He recalled that the move “changed how we felt about ourselves. It changed how we were able to train our students. It changed the spirit of the organization to focus on getting even better.” He sees the expansion having the same potential impact for the Parsons Center. DiPietro kept the focus on students and introduced Brownyard, who was accepted to begin the nursing program this fall. “I never thought that in my wildest dreams that I would get to graduate from the UT Martin Parsons Center,” Brownyard said. “And now I will get to be one of the first ever to graduate from the new BSN program.” She thanked Jim and Janet Ayers and the Ayers Foundation for helping her “through every single semester of college” and added, “This new addition gives so many students the hope that one day that they can graduate while still staying close to home and saving a little bit of money.” Harbert Alexander Jr., chairman of the West Tennessee Healthcare Foundation board, talked about the nursing program’s future impact on the region. He also acknowledged the Ayers for challenging the West Tennessee Healthcare Foundation “to step up and commit to the largest project that we’ve ever tried to accomplish.”A surprise ending to the program came when Jo Ann Ayers Lynn, sister of Jim Ayers, and Chancellor Tom Rakes unveiled a bust of the businessman and philanthropist. “This is a wonderful honor that, I promise you, I don’t deserve,” a grateful Ayers said. Janet Ayers followed her husband to the podium a short time later and said, “Jim, you are deserving of a lot of attention and a lot of recognition, …” but added that one person can’t achieve things alone. “It is a whole community that comes together to make things like this (the Parsons Center) happen,” she said. ###PHOTO CAPTION: Ready to cut ribbon Aug. 28 for the new West Tennessee Healthcare Foundation Nursing Wing at the UT Martin Parsons Center are (l to r) Harbert Alexander Jr, chairman of West Tennessee Healthcare Foundation board; Dr. Tom Rakes, UT Martin chancellor; Dr. Kelli Deere, Parsons Center director, Dr. Joe DiPietro, UT president, and Janet and Jim Ayers of the Ayers Foundation. ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=261&month=08&day=29&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=261&month=08&day=29&year=2014Fri, 29 Aug 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA['Guitar as Art' contest and exhibition gallery opening set for Aug. 31]]>MARTIN, Tenn. — Acoustic guitars converted into 2D art will be featured in an exhibition starting Sunday, Aug. 31, in the UT Martin Fine Arts Building Gallery. The exhibition opens at 2 p.m., followed at 2:45 by award presentations for the Guitar As Art Contest. The event is part of the 21st Annual Tennessee Soybean Festival, Aug. 28-Sept. 6, and is free and open to the public. The exhibition will feature acoustic guitars altered by local artists using 2D media such as painting, mosaic, photo transfer and drawing. A $500 purchase prize will be given to the winning entry, and the guitar will be featured in print advertising for the 2015 Tennessee Soybean Festival. A People’s Choice Award will also be awarded. For additional information, contact Katie Smith, UT Martin coordinator for student organizations, at 731-881-1864.###PHOTO CAPTION: Katie Smith, UT Martin coordinator for student organizations, and Jason Stout, assistant professor of art and faculty adviser for the League of Striving Artists, created the “Guitar for Art” contest. ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=260&month=08&day=29&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=260&month=08&day=29&year=2014Fri, 29 Aug 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[Ribbon-cutting ceremony to officially open nursing wing at UT Martin Parsons Center]]>MARTIN, Tenn. – A ribbon-cutting ceremony Aug. 28 will officially open the new West Tennessee Healthcare Foundation Nursing Wing at the UT Martin Parsons Center. The event is set for 10:30 a.m. at the center located at 975 Tennessee Avenue North in Parsons. The public is invited. University of Tennessee President Joe DiPietro, UT Martin Chancellor Tom Rakes, local and state elected officials and university nursing faculty members are expected to join Parsons Center students and others for the ceremony. Dr. Kelli Deere, Parsons Center director, will lead the event. Initial funding for the expansion was included in the 2013-14 budget proposed by Gov. Bill Haslam and approved by the Tennessee General Assembly. A $1 million appropriation was made to build a 10,000-square-foot addition to the current facility. The addition includes classrooms, a skills laboratory and a high-fidelity computerized simulation laboratory.The expansion plans received an added boost when the West Tennessee Healthcare Foundation also made a $1 million commitment to the project. The Parsons Center will have openings for up to 30 students annually for the program. BSN program graduates will be eligible to take the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses and obtain licensure as registered nurses. The university recently announced that nursing graduates in the class of 2014 achieved a 100 percent pass rate on the NCLEX-RN.“We are pleased to expand nursing education opportunities at the Parsons Center,” said Dr. Tom Rakes, university chancellor. “The most recent nursing licensure examination pass rates reflect that UT Martin nursing graduates are among the best in Tennessee. This expansion will help to increase the number of highly qualified nurses for the region.”Nursing students at the Parsons Center will receive the same experience as those students enrolled at the Martin campus. The program works with health-care facilities across the region to provide three years of clinical experience for its students. Similar programs at other institutions offer only two years of clinical experience. The Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing recommended reaccreditation for the UT Martin Department of Nursing in June. ###MEDIA ADVISORY – Members of the news media are invited to attend and cover this event. For special arrangements or additional information, contact Bud Grimes, UT Martin Office of University Relations, 731-881-7615, or e-mail bgrimes@utm.edu. PHOTO CAPTION – Workers are putting the final touches on the new West Tennessee Healthcare Foundation Nursing Wing at the UT Martin Parsons Center. A ribbon-cutting ceremony to officially open the expansion is set for 10:30 a.m. at the center located at 975 Tennessee Avenue North in Parsons. The public is invited. ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=254&month=08&day=20&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=254&month=08&day=20&year=2014Wed, 20 Aug 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[ACT prep courses offered starting in September by UT Martin ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/ecos/nondegree.php.### ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=253&month=08&day=19&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=253&month=08&day=19&year=2014Tue, 19 Aug 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[UT Martin freshman class arrives Aug. 21; fall classes begin Aug. 25]]> MARTIN, Tenn. — The University of Tennessee at Martin welcomes the class of 2018 this Thursday, Aug. 21, as more than 1,100 freshman students arrive in Martin and move into residence halls. The new students will participant in the First-Year Initiative Welcome Weekend, an orientation program that prepares students for fall classes that begin Monday, Aug. 25.After Welcome Weekend, students will participate in the semester-long General Studies 101 class that prepares and positions first-year students to achieve academic and social success. Following Thursday’s move-in, First-Year Initiative activities include a 5 p.m. opening ceremony Friday in the Elam Center, orientation sessions all day Saturday and Sunday afternoon, and a combination student organization fair and city of Martin merchants fair beginning at 5 p.m., Monday, also in the Elam Center. The university’s Division of Student Affairs and the city of Martin will co-sponsor the fair. Final enrollment numbers will be official after the 14th day of classes in September. Total enrollment will include students at the Martin campus and the university’s centers in Jackson, Parsons, Ripley and McNairy County/Selmer. Fall 2013 enrollment was 7,423 students. ###PHOTO CAPTION – Students are pictured moving into UT Martin residence halls for the start of fall semester 2013. This scene will be repeated many times Thursday, Aug. 21, as the class of 2018 arrives at the university just ahead of 2014 fall classes that begin Aug. 25. ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=252&month=08&day=18&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=252&month=08&day=18&year=2014Mon, 18 Aug 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[2014 UT Martin nursing graduates achieve 100 percent NCLEX-RN pass rate]]>MARTIN, Tenn. — University of Tennessee at Martin nursing graduates in the class of 2014 achieved a 100 percent pass rate on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses. The NCLEX-RN measures the competencies needed for individuals to perform safely and effectively as newly licensed, entry-level nurses. The National Council of State Boards of Nursing implemented a test plan and increased passing standard change in 2013 to the NCLEX-RN. With this change, the passing rate for first-time, U.S.-educated nurses decreased nationally by nearly 10 percent. “This (100 percent pass rate) is especially exciting considering the difficulty of the exam,” said Dr. Mary Radford, UT Martin nursing department chair. “We’ve taken significant steps to better prepare students for the test, and it has paid off. This result is a direct reflection of the hard work and effort of these graduates.”UT Martin’s four-year Bachelor of Science in Nursing program includes one year of academic prerequisites and three years of nursing courses. The university’s BSN program is distinctive in offering three years of clinical nursing courses in a variety of health-care settings. This experience prepares graduates for entry-level registered nurse positions in primary, secondary and other health-care settings and for entry into advanced-degree nursing programs. The BSN degree is offered at the Martin campus and the UT Martin Parsons Center. An RN-to-BSN completion program is offered both online and at the UT Martin Ripley Center for students who have an associate degree or a diploma in nursing. ###PHOTO CAPTION – Erica Glisson, of Dresden, is a member of the UT Martin Bachelor of Science in Nursing class of 2014 that achieved a 100 percent pass rate on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses. The NCLEX-RN measures the competencies needed for individuals to perform safely and effectively as newly licensed, entry-level nurses. ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=251&month=08&day=15&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=251&month=08&day=15&year=2014Fri, 15 Aug 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[13th annual Mid-South Agricultural Finance Conference attracts top speakers]]> MARTIN — RICHARD BROCK SPEAKS AT AGRICULTURAL FINANCE CONFERENCE – Richard Brock, owner and president of Brock Associates, was a presenter at the 13th annual Mid-South Agricultural Finance Conference on Aug. 6 at UT Martin’s Boling University Center. The conference provided practical information for lenders, farmers and other farm-related business owners. Brock discussed the marketing outlook and associated risk management tools for producers and lenders. Listening in the foreground is Dr. Tom Payne, chairholder, UT Martin Dunagan Chair of Excellence in Banking, one of the conference sponsors. Other sponsors were the Tennessee Farm Bureau, CoBank, Carroll Bank and Trust and FarmerMac. ### ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=250&month=08&day=09&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=250&month=08&day=09&year=2014Sat, 09 Aug 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[REED Center offers small business boot camp and small business loan opportunity starting in September]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=248&month=08&day=08&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=248&month=08&day=08&year=2014Fri, 08 Aug 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[Back-to-School Bash planned Aug. 15 at the UT Martin Jackson Center]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=246&month=08&day=06&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=246&month=08&day=06&year=2014Wed, 06 Aug 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[Amy Fenning is new director of UT Martin International Programs and International Admissions]]>MARTIN, Tenn. — Amy Fenning, a 24-year veteran in the international education field, is the new director for the Office of International Programs and International Admissions at the University of Tennessee at Martin. She began her duties Aug. 1.The Office of International Programs and International Admissions houses the Tennessee Intensive English Program and also recruits international students to study at the university. The TIEP offers English courses for speakers of other languages, prepares students to enter UT Martin and conducts special contract programs. “I fell in love with the community and people when I came to interview in early May,” Fenning said, “and I am very excited to finally be here and look forward to serving the international students and campus here at UTM.”Before coming to UT Martin, Fenning coordinated a large community college program at North Seattle Community College in Washington and directed programs for Language Consultants International at Park University in Missouri and for the University of Central Arkansas. She was an online teacher educator for Seattle Pacific University’s School of Teaching English as a Second Language and has also taught at universities in Istanbul, Munich and Japan. Fenning has a Bachelor of Journalism from the University of Missouri-Columbia and a Master of Education from Seattle University. Additional information about the Office of International Programs and International Admissions is found on the Web at http://www.utm.edu/departments/intprog/.###PHOTO CAPTION – Amy Fenning. ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=247&month=08&day=06&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=247&month=08&day=06&year=2014Wed, 06 Aug 2014 09:00:00 -0500