UTM RSS Feedhttp://www.utm.edu/_imgs/154x154-UTM-Logo.jpgUTM RSS Feedhttp://www.utm.eduhttp://www.utm.eduThis is the RSS Feed for UTM Headlines.en-us<![CDATA[UT Martin professor coaches for Team Tennessee in Special Olympics USA National Games]]> MARTIN, Tenn. – Coaches are often special people, and they often have the privilege of coaching special people. Dr. Clinton Smith, UT Martin assistant professor of special education, did just that when he attended the Special Olympics USA National Games held June 14-21, in New Jersey.Smith attended the 2006, 2010 and then this year’s National Games as a coach. He recently applied for an athletics coach’s position for the 2015 World Games to be held in Los Angeles, Calif., which includes more than 7,000 athletes from 170 countries. For all of his efforts, he was recently awarded the Kiwanis Louisiana-Mississippi-West Tennessee District Teacher of the Year, which included a $250 gift for Special Olympics. He was also honored earlier this year as the Tennessee Education Association’s Distinguished Educator for Higher EducationSmith served as the head coach for the Team Tennessee Athletics Track and Field team. Smith coached 10 Tennessee athletes who participated in weeklong track and field events, including: 100m, 200m, 400m, 4x100m relays, long jump and softball throw. The Tennessee Athletics Team won a total of 17 medals: six gold, four silver and seven bronze. The men’s 4x100m relay team won bronze in their division, missing silver by just a .23 of a second difference in time. “This was an amazing opportunity for me to coach some outstanding Special Olympics athletes from across Tennessee. These athletes showed true dedication and confidence in their desire to win like no other,” Smith said. “These athletes always inspire me to be a better person but also remind me to take time to slow down and have some fun. Sometimes we get so busy with our lives we tend to forget to do that.”The Special Olympians took Smith’s advice and had time for fun beyond the games. Non-competition activities included visiting the New Jersey boardwalk, complete with rides and games; participating in a dinner cruise on the Hudson River with a view of Freedom Tower and the Statue of Liberty; and attending a baseball game featuring the Trenton Thunder, the New York Yankees’ minor league team. Athletes also took part in Healthy Athletes, where they received a full health screening, including hearing, vision, dental, foot care and blood pressure screenings. They participated in the opening and closing ceremonies, attended by celebrities, including model and actress Brooklyn Decker; NBA Rookie of the Year Michael Carter-Williams; WWE Stars Big Show and Daniel Otunga; actress Jane Lynch; and Special Olympics International CEO Tim Shriver. Many celebrities and professional athletes visited the game sites and awarded medals to the athletes. “The Special Olympics USA National Games was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for some of the athletes. By being a part of these games, these athletes learned more about building confidence, friendship and teamwork,” Smith said. “These kids had a chance to compete at a national level, and they rose to the challenge by showing the nation that they are champions in their individual track and field events.” Special Olympics Tennessee sent 88 Special Olympians and 32 coaches and caddies to participate in athletics, aquatics, bocce, power lifting, golf, tennis, traditional basketball, unified basketball and flag football. More than 3,500 athletes, 1,000 coaches and over 10,000 volunteers attended the National Games, which are held every four years. ###Suggested Photo CaptionMARTIN, Tenn., July 21, 2014 – SPECIAL ATHLETES – Dr. Clinton Smith, (back row, far right), served as the head coach for the Team Tennessee Athletics Track and Field team, pictured. The team won a total of 17 medals at this year’s Special Olympic Games, held June 14-21 in New Jersey. ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=240&month=07&day=21&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=240&month=07&day=21&year=2014Mon, 21 Jul 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[Mid-South Ag Finance Conference, set for Aug. 6, to focus on economic conditions, commodity price risk, farm profitability and transition planning]]>MARTIN, Tenn. – Dr. David Kohl, internationally known speaker to agricultural lenders, small business owners, producers and agribusiness audiences, is the featured presenter at the13th annual Mid-South Agricultural Finance Conference. The conference is for lenders, farmers and other farm-related business owners and will be held from 8 a.m.-2:45 p.m., Wednesday, Aug. 6, in the Boling University Center at the University of Tennessee at Martin. “As one of the world’s leading ag economists who serves on policy boards and manages his own farming operation, Dave Kohl provides lenders and producers with the most up-to-date and practical information available,” said Dr. Tom Payne, UT Martin Dunagan Chair of Excellence in Banking. This year Dave will be joined by two of the most renowned experts in agricultural operations and risk management.”In addition to conducting more than 5,000 workshops and seminars for agricultural lenders and producers, Kohl is a leader in establishing national and international standards for reporting and analysis of agricultural producers’ financial information. Kohl will discuss the latest trends in real estate values, changes in farm family finances and a new business equation for success. He will provide producers and lenders with an overview of the global trends and domestic policies that affect the agricultural bottom line. Joining Kohl on the program will be nationally known experts in farm transition planning, price trends and risk management. Dr. Steve Isaacs, University of Kentucky Extension professor in agricultural economics and co-director of the Kentucky Agricultural Leadership Program, will focus on passing the farm operation from one generation to the next by providing the lender-producer team with potential pitfalls and practical tips for successful transition planning. This year’s conference will also include a discussion of commodity prices and risk management. Richard Brock, president of Brock Associates, will discuss the marketing outlook and associated risk management tools for producers and lenders. Brock’s recent analysis of corn, soybean and cotton price trends provides a basis for decision making for the coming year. The conference will conclude with an interactive question-and-answer panel session with the participants and speakers. “The Ag Finance Conference always provides participants with practical ‘take-home’ knowledge from some of the nation’s foremost agricultural experts,” said Joe Brasher, First State Bank community bank president of Sharon. “Each session is designed to provide the most relevant and up-to-date information for lenders and ag producers.”The registration fee is $150 for lenders, $75 for farmers and $25 for spouses and students. Members of the total management team, including spouses and other business partners, are encouraged to attend. Registration information is available by calling 731-881-7324 or by visiting www.utm.edu/agconference. Space is limited, and the deadline for registration is July 31. A service of the UT Martin Horace and Sara Dunagan Chair of Excellence in Banking, the Mid-South Ag Finance Conference is made possible through the support of the Tennessee Farm Bureau, CoBank, Carroll Bank and Trust, and FarmerMac.###SUGGESTED PHOTO CAPTION: Dr. David Kohl, internationally known speaker to agricultural lenders, small business owners, producers and agribusiness audiences, will be the featured presenter at the13th annual Mid-South Agricultural Finance Conference. The conference is for lenders, farmers and other farm-related business owners and will be held from 8 a.m.-2:45 p.m., Wednesday, Aug. 6, in UT Martin’s Boling University Center. The conference registration deadline is July 31. ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=238&month=07&day=16&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=238&month=07&day=16&year=2014Wed, 16 Jul 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[West Tennessee Writing Project announces September conference on writing, teaching and publishing]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/ecos/nondegree.php. Persons interested in attending may also call the UT Martin Office of Extended Campus and Online Studies at 731-881-7080 for registration. See WTWP’s web site for updates on the conference: http://www.utm.edu/departments/wtwp/. Shannon Lyon teaches at Obion County Central and is author of the novel Cotton’s Daughter. Julia Schuster teaches at St. Agnes Academy-St. Dominic School in Memphis and is author of Flowers for Elvis, a novel, and The Ingredients of Gumbo, a collection of stories, poems, essays and sketches. Jenna Wright is chair of the UT Martin Department of English and Modern Foreign Languages and has published writings in several journals, including Calliope, and has received honors in both nonfiction and national poetry contests. She is currently working on a memoir. ### ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=239&month=07&day=15&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=239&month=07&day=15&year=2014Tue, 15 Jul 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[Tennessee 4-H Roundup coming July 21-25 to UT Martin]]>MARTIN, Tenn. – For the 91st year, 4-H members from across Tennessee are gathering for the State 4-H Roundup and All Star Conference. The annual event, which takes place July 21-25, recognizes the outstanding project work and leadership accomplishments of senior high 4-H members. Approximately 300 high school age 4-Hers from across Tennessee will meet for several days on the UT Martin campus. The 4-Hers have completed local projects in areas such as communication and public speaking, livestock, computers and technology and photography and will now compete for statewide awards that include college scholarships and trips to the National 4-H Congress in Atlanta. The theme for this meeting and for all 4-H programs in 2014 is “Tennessee 4-H: Geared for Greatness.”“Teens from all over Tennessee will come together, compete in their project areas, learn life skills such as leadership and citizenship, make lifelong friends and have a great time,” said Lori Gallimore, UT Extension Specialist in 4-H Youth Development. “Roundup is one of the highlights for our 4-H program. Delegates who attend have spent years of work in their respective project areas.” In addition to project competitions, delegates will participate in a number of activities, including the 4-H All Star Conference, Vol State Ceremony, the election of the 2015 State Council officers and a service-learning project.Delegates to the 2014 Tennessee 4-H Roundup and All Star Conference will work with Nashville-based Operation Troop Aid as their service project. OTA’s mission is to provide care packages for deployed U.S. service members with the revenue generated through professional concert promotions and public financial generosity. Roundup participants already organized fundraising events in their counties and will assemble the care packages for shipping while they are at UT Martin.“Service-learning opportunities are a very important component of the 4-H program,” said Steve Sutton, director, 4-H Youth Development. “Each year, 4-Hers statewide perform tens of thousands of hours of service at an estimated value of over $1 million. Through the service-learning projects, our 4-Hers learn that they can really make a difference in their communities.” 4-H is the youth development program for University of Tennessee Extension. 4-H teaches leadership, citizenship and service learning to more than 180,000 youth in the fourth through 12th grades. 4-H also has more than 5,000 adult volunteers. UT Extension is one of four units in the UT Institute of Agriculture. ### ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=237&month=07&day=14&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=237&month=07&day=14&year=2014Mon, 14 Jul 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[UT Martin Day set for July 12 in Somerville]]>MARTIN, Tenn. — University of Tennessee at Martin officials will host UT Martin Day at 10 a.m., Saturday, July 12, on the court square in Somerville. The street to the west side of the court square will be blocked for the UT Martin tent, and the event will extend to the Fayette County Career Center, also located on the square. Persons interested in taking UT Martin classes this fall are invited.The mayors of both Somerville and Fayette County will give opening remarks, and Dr. Tom Rakes, university chancellor, and Dr. Tommy Cates, executive director for the university’s Office of Extended Campus and Online Studies, are among those scheduled to attend. Cates will also introduce representatives from each of the university’s five colleges: Business, Education, Agriculture, Humanities and Engineering. These representatives will be in the career center’s seminar rooms and classrooms and will serve as individual advisors to those interested in UT Martin classes. Representatives from both the university’s administration and the Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships will be present in the two classrooms of the career center to offer seminars and in the computer lab to assist participants with completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid. The university tent will also be at the cities of Oakland and Piperton on the same day. A meeting will be held for those interested in joining the advisory board in Fayette County. Other festivities will include an alumni table for visitors and a live radio remote. The classes scheduled to be offered this fall include: English 100, Mathematics 100, Geology 110, Geography 151, Political Science 220, History 475 and two agriculture courses to be chosen from among International Food and Fiber Systems 295, Behavior of Farm and Companion Animals 260, Farm Animal Health 320 or Introduction to Natural Resources Management 100. Fall semester classes begin Aug. 25 and will meet four nights per week from 6-9 p.m. in the career center’s two classrooms. More information about UT Martin academic programs is available at www.utm.edu. ###Suggested Photo Caption: A banner promotes UT Martin Night on July 12 in Somerville as the Memphis Knights Band performs June 26 at the Fayette Ware High School football stadium. The university’s tent was in place at the 18th Annual Music in the Park and Fireworks Display. UT Martin staff members also participated in the rain-shortened City of Oakland Independence Day Celebration on June 28 at West Junior High School. ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=236&month=07&day=02&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=236&month=07&day=02&year=2014Wed, 02 Jul 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[STEMulation Camp competition winners announced]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=235&month=06&day=30&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=235&month=06&day=30&year=2014Mon, 30 Jun 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[Caroline Cannon, Covington student, receives Nick Dunagan WestStar Leadership Scholarship]]>MARTIN, Tenn. — Caroline Cannon, a sophomore nursing major from Covington, was awarded the 2014-15 Nick Dunagan WestStar Leadership Scholarship during the WestStar graduation program, June 19, in Jackson. She is the daughter of Harriet and Lenard Cannon. Harriet is area director for USDA Rural Development and a 2000 WestStar graduate. The scholarship goes to a student who has proven leadership skills or displays leadership potential. Preference is given to students who display a high level of academic achievement and who have a proven record of community or university involvement. The WestStar Board of Trustees selects the scholarship recipient. Dr. Nick Dunagan is a WestStar Leadership Program founder, former executive director of the program and UT Martin chancellor emeritus. He established the scholarship to be awarded to a dependent of a WestStar alumnus whose student is enrolled at the university. Eligible students interested in applying for the scholarship can contact the WestStar Leadership Program at 731-881-7298. ###SUGGESTED CAPTION: Caroline Cannon (center), a sophomore nursing major from Covington, received the 2014-15 Nick Dunagan WestStar Leadership Scholarship during the WestStar graduation program, June 19, in Jackson. Charley Deal, executive director, WestStar Leadership Program, and her mother, Harriet Cannon, area director for USDA Rural Development, join Caroline following the scholarship announcement. ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=233&month=06&day=27&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=233&month=06&day=27&year=2014Fri, 27 Jun 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[Final Summer Orientation and Registration (SOAR) set for July 18]]> MARTIN, Tenn. — The final Summer Orientation and Registration program for incoming University of Tennessee at Martin freshmen is set for July 18. Registration will begin at 8:30 a.m. in the Boling University Center, followed by a welcome at 8:30 and informational sessions at 9. Students must have applied for admission and received a tentative or final acceptance letter to attend SOAR. Advance SOAR registration is required. During SOAR, students meet with academic advisers and register for classes; tour the campus, residence halls and University Village; receive information about student activities, housing and financial aid; and hear detailed information about First-Year Initiative, an orientation for freshmen the week before classes. Students should attend both SOAR and First-Year Initiative before fall semester, which begins Aug. 25.Informational sessions for students and parents cover student health services, public safety, the bookstore, student employment and other topics. Additional concurrent sessions cover student activities, Greek life, housing and meal plans. Administrative offices will be open, and students and parents will have additional time to visit with housing, admissions and financial aid staff members.For more information, call the Office of Admissions toll free at 1-800-829-UTM1 or 731-881-7027. Online registration is also available at www.utm.edu.###SUGGESTED CAPTION: (l to r) Brooke Morrow, Leanna Coleman, Kelly Reed, Matt Castleman, Seth Daniels and Seth Carr, all Westview High School graduates, recently attended Summer Orientation and Registration ahead of 2014 fall semester classes at UT Martin. The final SOAR will be held July 18, with registration set to begin at 8:30 a.m. For more information, call the Office of Admissions toll free at 1-800-829-UTM1 or 731-881-7027. Online registration is also available at www.utm.edu. Fall semester classes begin Aug. 25. ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=234&month=06&day=27&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=234&month=06&day=27&year=2014Fri, 27 Jun 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[UT Martin men's rodeo team captures first-ever CNFR title]]>CASPER, Wyo. – The University of Tennessee at Martin men’s rodeo team put the finishing touches on a dominant performance at the 2014 College National Finals Rodeo on June 21, earning the national men’s team championship with 755 overall points. The team's performance capped off a spectacular week for head coach John Luthi and UT Martin, who sat atop the men’s team standings for the final five days of the event. The previous best finish for the UT Martin men’s team at the CNFR was third place in both 1985 and 2008. UT Martin held off a late charge by Tarleton State University, who finished second with 730 points. Individually, UT Martin boasted three cowboys who finished with top-four national finishes. Clark Adcock’s time of 8.8 in tie down roping earned him second place accolades in the short go while also earning a rank of second place overall (37.5). Tyler Waltz’s score of 75.5 placed fifth in the short go tonight, clinching a third place CNFR finish with 311.5 total points. Will Lummus (10.8, seventh) also competed in the short go of tie down roping this evening, finishing with an overall fourth place finish (40.1). Lummus also earned a spot in the short go finals of steer wrestling tonight but ran into some bad luck and did not score. He finished 10th in the nation in that event. Adcock also placed third in the men’s all-around cowboy category with 270 overall points.Photo Caption - UT Martin rodeo coach John Luthi and his wife, Diane, were welcomed back home Tuesday, June 24, in the UT Martin Office of Intercollegiate Athletics. Skyhawk coaches, members of the athletics staff, Chancellor Tom Rakes, fans and others congratulated the Luthis and celebrated the men's rodeo team's first national championship. ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=232&month=06&day=24&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=232&month=06&day=24&year=2014Tue, 24 Jun 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[UT Martin tuition rises six percent]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=230&month=06&day=19&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=230&month=06&day=19&year=2014Thu, 19 Jun 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[UT Board of Trustees approve name for new Chi Omega House]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=231&month=06&day=19&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=231&month=06&day=19&year=2014Thu, 19 Jun 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[Recent UT Martin graduate interns at historic Pinehurst No. 2]]>MARTIN, Tenn. -- Colton Jones, of Savannah, remembers his internship orientation weekend like it was yesterday, but he will never forget his internship at historic Pinehurst No. 2, the site of this year’s men’s and women’s U.S. Opens in back- to-back weeks.During his orientation weekend, as he was walking the historic course in North Carolina, designed by Donald Ross, he reached down to pick a hen bit weed. He was quickly reprimanded and told to put the weed back.Instead of getting frustrated, he put the weed back and asked why. “The weed provided personality and I understood that,” Jones said. “Pinehurst has personality and character, and it is how golf was supposed to be played,” Jones said.Jones was an agriculture major at UT Martin with plenty of plant and soil science classes and golf course landscape management courses. He wants to be a golf course manager.“Augusta National is the mecca for many in my position,” Jones said. “My mecca is Pinehurst No. 2.”Jones’ reason is twofold. First back-to-back U.S. Opens and then a conversion from bent grass greens to ultra dwarf Bermudagrass. “This is cool season vs. warm season Bermuda,” Jones said. “This internship is priceless.”The internship at Pinehurst No. 2 is not Jones’ first hands-on experience. At the end of his freshman year, Jones worked on the grounds crew with the Jackson Generals baseball team with Tyler Brewer, who is now in charge of grounds at Virginia Tech.At the end of his sophomore year, Jones completed an internship at Callawassie Island Golf Course, a 27-hole course near Hilton Head in Okatie, S.C. The course has ultra dwarf Bermudagrass.After his junior year at UT Martin, Jones worked at Charlotte (N.C.) Country Club. “I was spoiled. They made sure I got experience on all the equipment,” Jones said.He also had hands-on experience with the Bill and Amy Rhodes Golf Center on the UT Martin campus. “We are able to practice athletically, and we are able to practice academically, “ said Dr. Wes Totten, associate professor of agriculture, geosciences and natural resources. Totten and his turf management students can take great pride in the facility because they know they played a vital part in the year-old facility. “Hands-on experience is priceless, “said Jones, one of Totten’s students. “That’s what the Bill and Amy Rhodes Golf Center is for me, hands-on experience.” Jones said the facility and the hands-on experience should make the difference for him when he looks for a job. “I would put my education against anyone in the nation.” While many work their final internship with future employment in sight, Jones is not looking for his next job. He has faith that the right opportunity will come along.“I am not stressing about the end of this summer,” Jones said. “God will open doors for me.” ### ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=228&month=06&day=17&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=228&month=06&day=17&year=2014Tue, 17 Jun 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[UT Board of Trustees holds annual meeting June 18-19 in Knoxville]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=229&month=06&day=17&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=229&month=06&day=17&year=2014Tue, 17 Jun 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[Two local pageant winners set to compete in Miss Tennessee pageant in Jackson]]>MARTIN, Tenn. – Erica Glisson graduated from college with a nursing degree one month ago, but that doesn’t mean she is sleeping in and chilling out this summer. The recent University of Tennessee at Martin graduate is an early riser with plenty to do, and she will compete in next week’s Miss Tennessee pageant in Jackson.Camille Garner, from Tullahoma, a Tennessee Tech student, will also compete in the pageant. The two contestants won the Miss UT Martin and the Miss Tennessee Soybean Pageant titles, respectively.The contestants’ public activities kick off on Sunday, June 15, with the actual pageant beginning the evening of Wednesday, June 18, and culminating in the crowning of Miss Tennessee on Saturday, June 21. “I have been doing something every day,” Glisson said. “I have been studying for my nursing boards, which are about three weeks after the pageant,” she said. “I have been getting my dresses together, studying current events, practicing my song and working on my platform.”Glisson’s platform, “Love on a Leash”, includes her registered therapy dog, Heath. The whole platform involves character education. “I want to show how Heath is loyal to his family and friends.”The scholarship fund is based on a rich scholastic tradition which has been the cornerstone of the Miss America program since 1945. Today, educational achievements and public service continue to be the primary objectives for the Miss America and the Miss Tennessee organizations. In 2013, the Miss Tennessee Scholarship Foundation, Inc. awarded more $100,000 in cash scholarships to the participants.Glisson will settle in for pageant week with her roommate, Miss Decatur County, Sunday afternoon. “It’s just like basketball camp,” Glisson said. “It’s all fun and all the hard work is worth it.”For her talent, Glisson will sing the song “(They Just Keep) Moving the Line,” from the television show Smash.If all goes well for the Gleason native, she could very well live out one of the lines of the song, “It started as a rover and victory was mine.”]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=226&month=06&day=13&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=226&month=06&day=13&year=2014Fri, 13 Jun 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[Two local winners set to compete in Miss Tennessee pageant in Jackson]]>MARTIN, Tenn. – Erica Glisson graduated from college with a nursing degree one month ago, but that doesn’t mean she is sleeping in and chilling out this summer. The recent University of Tennessee at Martin graduate is an early riser with plenty to do, and she will compete in next week’s Miss Tennessee pageant in Jackson.Camille Garner, from Tullahoma, a Tennessee Tech student, will also compete in the pageant. The two contestants won the Miss UT Martin and the Miss Tennessee Soybean Pageant titles, respectively.The contestants’ public activities kick off on Sunday, June 15, with the actual pageant beginning the evening of Wednesday, June 18, and culminating in the crowning of Miss Tennessee on Saturday, June 21. “I have been doing something every day,” Glisson said. “I have been studying for my nursing boards, which are about three weeks after the pageant,” she said. “I have been getting my dresses together, studying current events, practicing my song and working on my platform.”Glisson’s platform, “Love on a Leash”, includes her registered therapy dog, Heath. The whole platform involves character education. “I want to show how Heath is loyal to his family and friends.”The scholarship fund is based on a rich scholastic tradition which has been the cornerstone of the Miss America program since 1945. Today, educational achievements and public service continue to be the primary objectives for the Miss America and the Miss Tennessee organizations. In 2013, the Miss Tennessee Scholarship Foundation, Inc. awarded more $100,000 in cash scholarships to the participants.Glisson will settle in for pageant week with her roommate, Miss Decatur County, Sunday afternoon. “It’s just like basketball camp,” Glisson said. “It’s all fun and all the hard work is worth it.”For her talent, Glisson will sing the song “(They Just Keep) Moving the Line,” from the television show Smash.If all goes well for the Gleason native, she could very well live out one of the lines of the song, “It started as a rover and victory was mine.” ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=227&month=06&day=13&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=227&month=06&day=13&year=2014Fri, 13 Jun 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[WestStar Leadership Program graduation set for June 19 in Jackson]]>MARTIN, Tenn. — Members of the 2014 WestStar Leadership Class will graduate Thursday night, June 19, at the Double Tree Hotel in Jackson. A 5:30 reception will be followed by dinner and the graduation ceremony. The University of Tennessee at Martin sponsors WestStar.The program is in its 25th year and has 710 graduates, most of who are from West Tennessee. The 2013 class includes 30 participants. Class members are competitively selected to learn new leadership skills and develop strategies for assisting communities in solving problems and maximizing potential. ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=224&month=06&day=11&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=224&month=06&day=11&year=2014Wed, 11 Jun 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[SOAR to help UT Martin students prepare for fall semester]]> MARTIN, Tenn. – Incoming freshmen who plan to attend the University of Tennessee at Martin during the fall semester can get prepared for college life by attending a Summer Orientation and Registration (SOAR) program.There are two remaining SOAR programs, June 19 and 20 and July 18.Students will get the opportunity to meet with academic advisers and register for classes; tour the campus, residence halls and University Village; receive information about student activities, housing and financial aid; and hear detailed information about First-Year Initiative (an orientation for freshmen the week before classes). Students should attend both SOAR and First-Year Initiative prior to the fall semester.Students and parents will participate in a variety of informational sessions such as those on student health services, public safety, bookstore, student employment and other topics. Additional concurrent sessions also are scheduled for students and parents with topics including student activities, Greek life, housing and meal plans. Administrative offices will be open and students and parents will get additional time to visit with UT Martin personnel in housing, admissions and financial aid.In order to attend SOAR, students must have applied for admission and received a tentative or final acceptance letter. Advance SOAR registration is required. For more information about SOAR, call the office of admissions toll free at 1-800-829-UTM1 or 731-881-7027. Online registration is also available at www.utm.edu. ### ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=225&month=06&day=11&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=225&month=06&day=11&year=2014Wed, 11 Jun 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[Parsons Center welcomes House Speaker Beth Harwell for nursing addition tour]]>MARTIN, Tenn., June 3, 2014 – TENNESSEE HOUSE SPEAKER TOURS PARSONS CENTER – Tennessee House Speaker Beth Harwell (right) joins Dr. Kelli Deere, UT Martin Parsons Center director, in a June 2 tour of the center’s new West Tennessee Healthcare Foundation Nursing Wing that will open in August. The expansion will house the university’s Bachelor of Science in Nursing program. Rep. Steve McDaniel (R-Parkers Crossroads), who represents Decatur County and also serves as deputy speaker, joined Harwell (R-Nashville) on the tour. ### ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=222&month=06&day=03&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=222&month=06&day=03&year=2014Tue, 03 Jun 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[Rick Robinson named new UT Martin baseball coach]]>MARTIN, Tenn. – University of Tennessee at Martin Chancellor Tom Rakes and athletics director Julio Freire have announced the hiring of Rick Robinson as the tenth head baseball coach in Skyhawk program history. A formal meet-and-greet to welcome Coach Robinson to UT Martin has been scheduled for 6:30 p.m., Monday, June 9 at the First State Bank second floor reception area on 106 University Street in Martin. All community members are welcome. “We are very pleased to have Coach Robinson lead our baseball program into a new era,” Dr. Rakes said. “He has an extended history coaching successful college baseball programs.” “We are ecstatic to hire a head coach of (Rick) Robinson’s caliber,” Freire said. “I am confident of his abilities to guide our baseball student-athletes and I am excited about the future of our program.” Robinson brings 17 years of head coaching experience to UT Martin, including the past 16 years transforming Young Harris College into a junior college and NCAA Division-II powerhouse. Robinson sports a 699-281 career head coaching record (.713 winning percentage) and boasts four 50-win seasons, eight conference championships, five Region XVII championships and one NJCAA World Series appearance. “I want to thank Chancellor Rakes and Julio for allowing me the opportunity to lead the UT Martin baseball program,” Robinson said. “My family and I are excited about becoming involved in the Martin community. This is the most exciting time of the year for college baseball. As I watch the postseason games it’s a great time to dream about the future of UT Martin baseball. With the help of the administration, I look forward to producing young men who know how to win in the classroom, on the diamond and in life after baseball.” Robinson, who has never had a losing record as a head coach, averaged 49.3 wins per season from 2002-08 in the junior college ranks before Young Harris transitioned into a four-year baccalaureate school competing in Division-II in 2011. The transition did not slow down Robinson, as he guided the Mountain Lions to 114 wins over his last four seasons. In his coaching career, Robinson has guided 38 players to the professional ranks, including 25 Major League Baseball draft selections. Current major leaguers who have played under Robinson include Baltimore Orioles outfielder Nick Markakis (seventh overall pick in the first round of the 2003 MLB Draft), Colorado Rockies outfielder Charlie Blackmon (72nd overall pick in the second round of the 2008 MLB Draft) and Atlanta Braves right-handed pitcher Cory Gearrin (138th overall pick in the fourth round of the 2007 MLB Draft). Robinson has coached a pair of National Players of the Year in Markakis (2003) and Bryson Smith (2009) and also worked with some of the game’s brightest college stars when he served as head coach of the Hiyamis Mets in the Cape Cod Baseball League in 2008. Robinson began his head coaching career at Brevard College in North Carolina, where he started the first baseball program in school history in 1992. In its inaugural season, Robinson posted a 33-22 overall record and a third place NJCAA Region X finish. A total of eight players from that Brevard team signed professional contracts. Robinson then took over at Young Harris in 1999 and immediately turned the program into one of the top junior college programs in the nation. His teams went 155-29 over a three-year span (2003-05) that saw the team set school records with 52 victories in both 2003 and 2004. He also led Young Harris to the 2007 NJCAA World Series in Grand Junction, Colo. and posted another 50-win campaign in 2008. Before his time at Young Harris, Robinson spent four years as an assistant coach at Old Dominion University, a Division-I school located in Norfolk, Va. During his time at the baseball-rich school, he served as third base coach, camp director and recruiting coordinator. At Old Dominion, Robinson helped the Monarchs to a pair of conference championships and back-to-back appearances in the NCAA Regionals (1995-96). In four recruiting classes, he helped produce 22 players who signed professional contracts, including Tim Hummel (second round pick, 52nd overall by the Chicago White Sox in the 2000 MLB Draft). Robinson also worked with current major leaguers David Wright (New York Mets), Michael Cuddyer (Colorado Rockies), Justin Upton (Atlanta Braves) and BJ Upton (Atlanta Braves) in Old Dominion’s camps. Before his appointment at Brevard College, Robinson posted a .672 winning percentage at the high school level in North Carolina. He led West Henderson High School in Hendersonville to its first-ever winning season and first berth in the state playoffs and also had a successful stint at Pisgah High School in Canton. A Brevard, NC native, Robinson played collegiate baseball at Appalachian State University in Boone, NC. He earned his degree from Appalachian State and later earned a Master’s degree from Furman University. Robinson is married to the former Luann DeGroat of Hawley, Pa. The couple has been married for more than 20 years and has three children: Faithe (17), Rhett (14) and Ryan (11). ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=223&month=06&day=03&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=223&month=06&day=03&year=2014Tue, 03 Jun 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[UT Martin hosting two governor's schools; students can earn college credit]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=219&month=05&day=30&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=219&month=05&day=30&year=2014Fri, 30 May 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[Threee WUTM FM students win awards in recent Associated Press contest]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=220&month=05&day=30&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=220&month=05&day=30&year=2014Fri, 30 May 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[Three WUTM FM students win awards in recent Associated Press contest]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=221&month=05&day=30&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=221&month=05&day=30&year=2014Fri, 30 May 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[UT Martin faculty member Steve Elliott remembers military sacrifices during 14th Memorial Commemoration event]]>MARTIN, Tenn. — Bill Stout, of Martin, had many reasons to attend the 14th Memorial Day Commemoration on Friday at the University of Tennessee at Martin. In fact, he can count 66 – the total combined years of military service for Stout and his two sons, Dave and Billy. Stout joined others in remembering the fallen and honoring retired and active military at the 9 a.m. event held on the lawn of the Hall-Moody Administration Building.Stout, now retired from the U.S. Army, served from 1949-69, which covered service in both Korea and Vietnam. He completed his military service as the first instructor in the Army ROTC program’s advanced course that began at UT Martin in 1964. His late son Dave, a retired Navy chief warrant officer, was among a small group of university employees that started the annual Memorial Day Commemoration event. His son Billy, also retired from the Navy, is a building inspector for the city of Martin. The university’s Army ROTC Battalion presented the colors, followed by the invocation given by Gerry Gallimore, a supervisor in the university’s greenhouse and grounds areas. Dr. Roberto Mancusi, associate professor of music, sang the National Anthem, and UT Martin Chancellor Tom Rakes welcomed the crowd. “We’re fortunate to live in a community of patriots and a nation recognized around the world as a bastion of freedom,” said UT Martin Chancellor Tom Rakes in his welcoming comments to the crowd. He noted that the purpose of Memorial Day has expanded from honoring fallen military members to include recognition of veterans, family members and active military. “There are few if any of us who are present today that have not been touched by war in some form,” he said. Cpt. Troy Shoemaker of the Army ROTC Battalion recognized Gold Star families (the immediate families of fallen service members), all veterans, and then introduced the speaker, Lt. Col. Steve Elliott. Elliott, a U.S. Military Academy graduate, commands the Army National Guard’s 1st Battalion, 238th Field Artillery. The UT Martin assistant professor of mathematics was deployed to Iraq for Operation Iraqi Freedom and to Djibouti for Operation Enduring Freedom. “Today, I want to tell you about several soldiers whose service and whose deaths have touched me personally,” Elliott said. He first noted the deaths of Staff Sgt. Lillian Clamens and Cpl. Samuel Pearson, who both died during a rocket attack while the evening meal was being served at Camp Victory in Baghdad, Iraq. “I mentioned Staff Sergeant Clamens and Corporal Pearson, because about eight minutes before the rocket impact which killed them, I was standing where they died,” Elliott said. “I’d just finished supper myself and was returning to work. “Now hundreds of people ate there that night, so my presence doesn’t make me special, but it makes Staff Sergeant Clamens’s and Corporal Pearson’s stories special to me, and I think of them often.”Elliott also recognized fallen members of the Army National Guard’s 2nd Battalion, 138th Field Artillery, a unit in which he served for more than a decade. “Its (the unit’s) soldiers have fought in every major U.S. conflict since the Spanish-American War, including in Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan,” he said. He participated in a memorial ceremony five years ago for the battalion’s fallen members, and he noted the significance of the 14 names he was about to read. “Bear in mind that the 2nd 138th Field Artillery is a National Guard Unit,” he said. “If two soldiers are in the same battery at the same time, then they’re most likely from the same community, went to the same high school and are often even related.” Seven of the 14 names he read were from the same town and died the same day in Vietnam. “Charlie Battery is headquartered in Bardstown, Kentucky,” he said after reading the names. “The 19th of June 1969 was a difficult day for that community.”Unlike the other names mentioned, Elliott closed by telling about a soldier who survived his World War II service as a decorated hero. Freeman Victor Horner, a Pennsylvania native and a member of K Company, 119th Infantry, 30th Infantry Division, participated in an attack in Wurselen, Germany. “He single-handedly destroyed three enemy machine gun positions and cleared the path for his company’s successful assault on Wurselen,” Elliott said, referencing Horner’s Congressional Medal of Honor citation. Elliott later met the war hero in the nursing home where his grandmother worked and was personally moved by Horner’s story. “That courage under fire against tremendous odds in support of freedom is why we honor the fallen.”“And most soldiers spend their entire careers without encountering a situation calling for the extreme heroism that Freemen Horner exhibited,” Elliott added. “However, the vast majority of them aspire to it, making a mental and spiritual commitment to be ready, if called upon, to deliberately risk their lives so that each of us can continue to enjoy the American way of life.”Rodney Freed, a U.S. Army veteran and UT Martin Department of Communications faculty member, offered the benediction. A 21-gun salute by the UT Martin Department of Public Safety and Martin Police Department and the playing of taps concluded the event.Harold Cochran, of Troy, senior broadcast engineer in the university’s Department of Communications, served in both the U.S. Air Force and Tennessee Air National Guard. His late father was retired from the Navy and was among several close family members who served in the military. “It means a lot that they (the university) would put this together and do this,” Cochran said following the event. “And this now being the 14th year that they’ve done it, it means a whole lot to veterans.”### ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=217&month=05&day=23&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=217&month=05&day=23&year=2014Fri, 23 May 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[House Speaker Beth Harwell to tour UT Martin Parsons Center on Monday, June 2]]>MARTIN, Tenn. – Tennessee House Speaker Beth Harwell (R-Nashville) will make her first visit to the UT Martin Parsons Center at 4:30 p.m., Monday, June 2. A tour of the new West Tennessee Healthcare Foundation Nursing Wing that will open in August is the focus of her visit to the center. The expansion will house the university’s Bachelor of Science in Nursing program.Joining Harwell will be Rep. Steve McDaniel (R-Parkers Crossroads), who represents Decatur County and also serves as deputy speaker. Initial funding for the expansion was included in the 2013-14 budget proposed by Gov. Bill Haslam and approved by the Tennessee General Assembly. A $1 million appropriation was made to build a 10,000-square-foot addition to the current facility. The addition includes classrooms, a skills laboratory and a high-fidelity computerized simulation laboratory.The expansion plans received an added boost when the West Tennessee Healthcare Foundation also made a $1 million commitment to the project. “I am looking forward to seeing this new addition to the University of Tennessee at Martin in Parsons,” Harwell said about her upcoming visit. “This nursing program works with health-care facilities across the state to provide experience for its students. Their commitment to excellence means enrollment is expected to hit its highest mark next year, and I am excited to tour the facility and meet the people who make the program a success day in and day out.”The Parsons Center will have openings for up to 30 students annually for the program. BSN program graduates will be eligible to take the National Council Licensure Exam for Registered Nurses and obtain licensure as registered nurses.Nursing students at Parsons will receive the same experience as those students enrolled at the Martin campus. The program works with health-care facilities across the region to provide three years of clinical experience for its students. Similar programs at other institutions offer only two years of clinical experience. A ribbon-cutting ceremony to celebrate the expansion is planned for August. ###MEDIA ADVISORY – Members of the news media are invited to attend and cover Speaker Harwell’s visit to the UT Martin Parsons Center. Her visit will last approximately 45 minutes. For special arrangements or additional information, contact Bud Grimes, UT Martin Office of University Relations, 731-881-7615, or e-mail bgrimes@utm.edu. ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=218&month=05&day=23&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=218&month=05&day=23&year=2014Fri, 23 May 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[Promise shown by UT pilot program in MOOC technology leads to continued state investment]]> KNOXVILLE, Tenn. – One year into a two-year pilot program, the University of Tennessee’s test of the utility of new online learning technology compared to other online platforms currently in use has achieved successful outcomes that resulted in additional state funding. Launched in May 2013, the pilot program is a partnership between the UT System and the Tennessee Board of Regents, funded by a $1 million appropriation from the state of Tennessee for online innovation projects in connection with Gov. Haslam’s “Drive to 55” campaign. Based largely on the pilot’s initial success, an additional $1 million appropriation was approved by the legislature last month. The added funding will be used broadly to apply lessons learned from the pilot or to test additional ways technology can be leveraged to improve student outcomes. The pilot program is using technology developed by Coursera and edX, national innovators in massive open online courses, or MOOCs. “Universities across the country are questioning what the future holds for higher education given rapid advances in technology, changing demands of those we serve and declining state support,” UT President Joe DiPietro said. “We must be open to considering new approaches to delivering education, and this is one example of how we’re doing that in Tennessee and at UT.” To date, four courses have been piloted on UT’s campuses across the state using the Coursera platform, which relies heavily on short video lectures, quizzes and immediate feedback to ensure students master each concept before moving to the next. Two courses were offered completely online, and two tested a “flipped classroom” approach, which requires students to watch lectures outside of class. Courses include:· English Rhetoric and Composition I and II, UT Chattanooga (fall 2013 and spring 2014)· Masterpieces of Music, UT Martin (fall 2013 and spring 2014)· College Algebra, UT Knoxville (spring 2014) “The excitement generated by this project has been energizing,” said India Lane, UT assistant vice president for academic affairs and student success. “Within a few months, it was easy to see how this type of investment and team effort helps us get in the trenches and test methods that we hope will reduce the number of students repeating introductory courses and lead to better retention and graduation rates.” Initial takeaways from the pilot include the value of course redesign and quality video instruction and the importance of course fit for success in an online platform. For Malissa Peery, a faculty member in the math department at UT Knoxville, the experience has been overwhelmingly positive for both her and participating students. “I’d never taught online before and was a little concerned about a flipped approach, but I really wanted to try it because I always hear students say they understand everything in class but can’t do it when they get home,” she said. “So it made perfect sense. They watch my lectures outside of class, and when we’re together, we’re doing exercises to reinforce the material and build connections between the concepts. “Even the energy level in the flipped class is different. The students are interacting, it’s less stressful and a lot more fun.” Roberto Mancusi, associate professor of music at UT Martin, has been teaching a general education music appreciation course online since 2010 and agreed to transition the course to Coursera to compare the two platforms. “I noticed students using Coursera were more engaged in the discussion board and offered more thought-based responses,” he said. “They seemed to have a better understanding of the material. They even started a discussion thread about what they thought of the course, and they all thought it was wonderful.” As an experienced online lecturer at UT Chattanooga and fan of technology, Tiffany Mitchell jumped at the chance to convert her online English rhetoric and composition II course to Coursera. She said she found the platform, in its current design, to be more of a content consumption tool better suited for lecture-heavy courses. She agreed the video aspect was a valuable addition but has continued using outside tools to allow for intense peer-to-peer and peer-to-instructor interaction. Three courses are being designed now for testing the edX platform. In fall 2014, a general education literature course using edX will launch at UT Martin, along with an upper-level education course at UT Chattanooga. The pilot will conclude in summer 2015 with all UT Knoxville freshmen being enrolled in First-Year Studies 100, a required course that takes place over the summer to help incoming students transition, using the edX platform. In total, more than 4,800 UT students are expected to participate in the Coursera and edX pilot courses, and their feedback, along with input from faculty and support staff, will continue to be collected, compared to experiences and student outcomes at TBR and used to determine next steps and future plans. “Through this pilot, we’re gaining valuable knowledge,” Lane said. “We intentionally mapped out a small pilot project and have proceeded carefully, monitoring the process and outcomes before considering any larger-scale adaption. As expected, the campus teams turned out fantastic course content, but we didn’t anticipate the synergy and exponential value we have gained from collaborating as a system and with TBR to brainstorm, share successes and address challenges. “What we’re seeing are the amazing results that can happen when you invest in a team effort like this and allow faculty the opportunity to focus their energy for the benefit of their students.” ---Suggested Photo Caption: Dr. Roberto Mancusi, UT Martin associate professor of music, taught in the first year of a two-year UT pilot program to test the utility of new online learning technology compared to other online platforms currently in use. Mancusi transitioned a general education music appreciation course that he has taught online to Coursera in support of the project. Follow-up InterviewsIndia Lane, UT assistant vice president for academic affairs and student success and pilot director is available upon request. Faculty participants also are available upon request. Video Clip of Coursera Coursehttp://www.tennessee.edu/system/academicaffairs/online-education/index.html About Courserahttps://www.coursera.org/ About edXhttps://www.edx.org/About the Pilot ProgramBackground information from the May 2013 announcement of the pilot is available at http://tennessee.edu/media/releases/053013_coursera.html State of Tennessee Funding for Pilot ProgramThe pilot program is the result of discussions between UT and TBR officials and UT Knoxville alumnus Randy Boyd, named in 2013 to a short-term appointment as the governor’s special advisor on higher education. The pilot is part of Governor Haslam’s “Drive to 55” initiative to increase education attainment levels of Tennesseans. Because of that connection, the pilot is funded by a $1 million special appropriation approved by the legislature and allocated July 1, 2013. Each system, UT and TBR, received $500,000 for startup costs for the pilot. Based largely on the quality and outcomes to-date of the pilot work, another $1 million in funds for online innovation projects has been approved by the legislature for the upcoming fiscal year. Institutions Participating in the Pilot:University of Tennessee Institutions· UT Chattanooga· UT Knoxville· UT MartinTennessee Board of Regents Universities· University of MemphisTennessee Board of Regents Community Colleges· Chattanooga State Community College· Northeast State Community College· Roane State Community College· Volunteer State Community College· Walters State Community College ### ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=216&month=05&day=22&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=216&month=05&day=22&year=2014Thu, 22 May 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[Chamber of commerce, WestStar sponsor election forum]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=215&month=05&day=21&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=215&month=05&day=21&year=2014Wed, 21 May 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[Veterinary Health Technology option receives accreditation]]>MARTIN, Tenn. — May was a big month for the veterinary health technology option at the University of Tennessee at Martin. The university was notified that the option received initial accreditation from the American Veterinary Medical Association Committee on Veterinary Technician Education and Activities. Then the first 20 students graduated from the program during spring commencement May 3. The AVMA website says “initial accreditation means the program is officially accredited.” The option could not be officially accredited until the first students completed the program, which happened in December 2013. Those students completed required internships during the spring and officially received their diplomas during May commencement. Graduates earn a bachelor’s degree in animal science with a veterinary health technology emphasis and can sit for the Veterinary Technician National Exam to become licensed. Another 13 students are expected to graduate from the program in August. Rachel Stegall, of Martin, was among those who received a degree in May.“I have always had a passion for animals so knew that I wanted to be in the animal health-care world one way or another,” Stegall said in an e-mailed statement. “When I heard about the veterinary health technology option, I knew it was my calling.”Stegall becomes a full-time veterinary health technologist June 1 at Hagyard Equine Medical Institute in Lexington, Ky. Hagyard is one of the oldest and most prestigious private equine practices in the world. “Earning initial accreditation is a significant milestone for our program,” said Dr. Jason Roberts, veterinarian and UT Martin assistant professor of animal science. “This speaks to the high quality of the option and the university’s support for offering the best possible academic experience and preparation for students.” Veterinary technologists are best described as the equivalent of registered nurses in the animal world. Courses were first taught in fall 2011 at UT Martin, and 120 students are now pursuing the option. It’s one of 24 accredited bachelor’s degree programs in the country, the only four-year program in West Tennessee and the only accredited veterinary technology program in West Tennessee. “There are lots of diverse job opportunities for licensed veterinary technologists,” Roberts said. “The job market is really strong.” Graduates can pursue careers working with veterinarians in clinics, veterinary hospitals, research, education, animal pharmaceutical sales and other options. The UT Martin program features hands-on learning opportunities with small, large and exotic animals on a 700-acre teaching farm. Situated on the farm is the university’s Agricultural and Natural Resources Teaching Complex. Two veterinarians and two veterinary technologists teach in the program that offers internships with local veterinarians, referral and teaching hospitals, zoos and laboratories. Program information is available by contacting Roberts at jroberts@utm.edu or by calling 731-881-7952.###Suggested Photo Caption:MARTIN, Tenn., May 19, 2014 – VETERINARY HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ACCREDITED – UT Martin’s veterinary health technology option has received initial accreditation from the American Veterinary Medical Association Committee on Veterinary Technician Education and Activities. The program graduated its first 20 students during spring commencement May 3. Dr. Jason Roberts (center), veterinarian and UT Martin assistant professor of animal science, works with students at the university’s teaching farm. ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=214&month=05&day=19&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=214&month=05&day=19&year=2014Mon, 19 May 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[14th annual Memorial Day commemoration ceremony set for May 23 at UT Martin]]>MARTIN, Tenn. – Lt. Col. Steve Elliott will be the guest speaker for the University of Tennessee at Martin Memorial Day program set for 9.a.m., Friday, May 23, in front of the Hall-Moody Administration Building on University Street.This will be the 14th annual Memorial Day Commemoration at UT Martin.Elliot grew up in Alabama. In 1993, he graduated from the United States Military Academy and was commissioned as a second lieutenant of field artillery. After five years of active service at Fort Stewart, Ga., he joined the National Guard and began graduate school at the University of Kentucky in Lexington.He completed his Ph.D. in mathematics and became an assistant professor at the University of Tennessee at Martin in 2005. Since then, he has deployed to Iraq for Operation Iraqi Freedom and to Djibouti for Operation Enduring Freedom. He currently commands the 1st Battalion, 238th Field Artillery and he continues to teach mathematics at UT Martin. He and his wife Holly have two sons, Cannon, 6, and Connor, 1. They live in Martin. Cpt. Troy Shoemaker, of the UT Martin of Military Science and Leadership, will serve as the master of ceremonies. Dr. Roberto Mancusi, associate professor of music, will perform the national anthem and Mr. Gerry Gallimore will offer the invocation. Rodney Freed, instructor in communications, will offer the benediction.UT Martin chancellor Tom Rakes will welcome guests.The UT Martin Department of Public Safety and Martin Police Department will be responsible for the gun salute, while the UT Martin Army ROTC Battalion is responsible for Taps. ### ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=212&month=05&day=14&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=212&month=05&day=14&year=2014Wed, 14 May 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[Online master's of education in counseling rated among the best]]>BestOnlineColleges.org and includes 34 schools sorted by affordability, flexibility and efficiency. UT Martin is the only Tennessee college or university included in the online counseling program list. BestOnlineColleges.org used data from the National Center for Education Statistics and evaluated it against a unique set of parameters to determine the list. Other factors considered for developing the list include accreditation, graduation rates, satisfaction with school choice, and student debt. “We’re pleased to be listed among the best online graduate programs in the country for school and clinical mental health counseling,” said Dr. Betty Cox, associate professor and chair for the UT Martin Department of Educational Studies. “A growing demand exists for qualified counselors, and our program does an excellent job preparing individuals for this important field.”UT Martin’s program offers concentrations in school counseling and clinical mental health counseling within the counseling major. The program can be completed online, but students attend a four-day residency to be admitted to candidacy and continue in the program. Each student is also required to complete a semester-long, supervised practicum and 600 hours of internship. These requirements are designed to help build a student’s understanding of counseling and prepare him or her for school counseling and clinical mental health careers. More information about the degree program can be found at www.utm.edu and search “counseling.” Interested persons can also call the UT Martin Education Graduate Programs office at 731-881-7128. ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=213&month=05&day=14&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=213&month=05&day=14&year=2014Wed, 14 May 2014 09:00:00 -0500<![CDATA[Taner Swinea exchanges 'Captain Skyhawk' costume for business suit]]>MARTIN, Tenn. — Taner Swinea might be the best-known person people didn’t know at the University of Tennessee at Martin. The Waynesboro, Tenn., native received undergraduate degrees in accounting and finance May 3, and with his walk across the Elam Center graduation stage, also ended a two-year run as the university’s mascot Captain Skyhawk. He was honored for his academic achievements and university service as he received one of three Paul and Martha Meek Leadership Awards during spring commencement. The award was first presented in 1970 and is given to a graduating senior who has demonstrated outstanding leadership qualities while attending the university. Paul Meek served as UT Martin’s chancellor from 1934-67, and the award was originally established and funded by the Meek children to honor their parents. “I was shocked,” Taner said in an e-mailed statement about receiving the award, which is the only award presented at commencement. He added, “It was an amazing feeling to be recognized like that in my last act as an undergraduate student at UTM.”Taner’s path to earning two college degrees and the Meek Award began at Wayne County High School, where he played several sports and later entered UT Martin to study biology. Attending medical school was his ultimate goal, and although he earned good grades in the sciences, he discovered that biology wasn’t his calling. He sought guidance through the university’s Student Success Center that offers testing to help students make career choices. “So I took some of those tests, and I’d already kind of thought about business, but then the results from that (the testing) kind of confirmed what I’d been thinking,” he said. “So then I just signed up for some classes and really liked it.” Swinea initially majored in finance, but an accounting professor later convinced him to pursue both degrees. He enrolled in accounting classes to prepare for the Certified Public Accountant exam, which counted toward the additional 30 hours required to earn two degrees. While he distinguished himself in the classroom, Taner also participated in many activities, including his role as a leader in the Peer Enabling Program, which helps with students’ transition from high school to college. “I knew how much it (the PEP Program) helped me when I came here,” he said. “So I just like to … help out others kind of the same way.”He was also involved in Greek Life as a member of Sigma Chi fraternity, where he served as academic chair and chaplain. While it was fun to participate in homecoming, Greek Week and other activities, the opportunities to practice his presentation skills at events “in front of … a few thousand people” helped to boost his confidence. And then there were his two years – mostly in an anonymous role – as Captain Skyhawk, the colorful UT Martin sports mascot. “Well, I’ve loved being the mascot,” Taner said of the experience. “That’s a lot of fun.” The former high school athlete added, “That was my way of being involved in athletics.” Taner began his run as Captain Skyhawk in fall 2012 by splitting time with the person who previously wore the costume. He became the full-time Captain at the beginning of spring semester 2013, with only an occasional break during the next two years. His top mascot experience came at the 2014 NCAA Women’s Basketball Tournament game in Chapel Hill as the Skyhawks lost a memorable first-round game by two points to the North Carolina Tar Heels. “I don't know – just something about being there,” Taner recalled. “It was so exciting and everything, and we were up so much, and then it was so heartbreaking.”With graduation behind him and degrees in hand, a financial analyst position awaits him with Cummins Inc., a Fortune 200 company located just north of Minneapolis, Minn. The company’s website describes Cummins as “a global power leader that designs, manufactures, sells and services diesel engines and related technology around the world.” Once again, campus involvement opened doors as he participated in the university’s Institute of Management Accountants and attended the 2012-13 IMA conference in San Antonio, Texas. As he completed the registration form, he noticed an opportunity to attach a resume, which he did when he submitted the form. “And then a couple of weeks later, I got an e-mail from them and it said, ‘Congratulations, you’ve been selected for an interview.’” Two interviews later, he received an internship during the summer of 2013 in Memphis. “And then, I found out about September (2013) that from the internship I’d been offered a position as a financial analyst,” he said, which removed a job search from his senior year to-do list.As he reflects on his college experience, Taner credits a hectic schedule during his last two years for teaching him valuable lessons beyond the classroom. “Even though my grades slipped (he graduated with a 3.78 grade point average), and I didn’t have as much time to study and everything, I feel like I learned a lot more being so busy,” he said. This spring semester, that included taking 19 academic hours, performing as Captain Skyhawk, serving as a facilitator for the university’s Leaders-in-Residence Program, and holding a job at the university’s Computer Store. “You learn a lot more outside the classroom than you do inside the classroom,” he said. “I feel like being here has … really prepared me well for being out in the real world.”Besides his new job, Taner plans to earn his CPA and some other credentials to improve his prospects in the company. Graduate school is also a possibility. In the meantime, few people have the opportunity to swap a mascot suit for business attire, but Taner Swinea is doing just that in his transition from college life to the corporate world. Moving from Captain Skyhawk to someday becoming a captain of industry has a nice ring to it for this new college graduate. ### ]]>http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=211&month=05&day=12&year=2014http://www.utm.edu/departments/univrel/archives/archive.php?id=211&month=05&day=12&year=2014Mon, 12 May 2014 09:00:00 -0500