Philanthropy

Derby Days

As an active member of the community, Sigma Chi is committed to giving back as much as possible. As a large organization, we believe that we can be a great asset to our community, and Derby Days is our annual campaign to raise funds for our official charity: The Huntsman Cancer Institute. Nationally, Derby Days has raised over $4.2 million dollars for the Huntsman Cancer Institute since 1992. Since 2006, the UTM Chapter has raised over $25,000, with over $6,500 of it last year alone. As an organization we believe in making sure that we take care of the community around us and that we give back to others who are in need.

Weekly events include: Penny Wars, Hat Chase, Dress Your Daddy, Brother Auction, and Sign a Sig. In addition we will have parties Monday, Wednesday, and Friday night to celebrate and raise money for a great cause. Each event in Derby Days will earn points for one of the competing sororities in a different way, and the sorority with the most points at the end will “win” Derby Days. The winning sorority will receive HALF of the total funds raised to be donated to a charity of their choice and their name on the Derby Days trophy.

 

Huntsman Cancer Institute

At the Sigma Chi 150th celebration in 2005, it was announced that the Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) was chosen to be one of the Fraternity's preferred charitable organizations, in addition to Children's Miracle Network. Founded by Significant Sig and Constantine Sig, Jon M. Huntsman Sr. (Pennsylvania 1959) the Huntsman Cancer Institute is dedicated to finding the causes of cancer, developing new and better treatments, and preventing people from ever developing cancer. This year alone, about 563,700 Americans are expected to die of cancer – more than 1,500 people a day. In an effort to cure this epidemic, Huntsman founded HCI to focus on understanding cancer from its very beginnings and to translate this knowledge to safer and more effective treatments. HCI was chosen because many Sigs and their families have been directly affected by cancer, the second leading cause of death in the United States.

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