Foreign Film Series

THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE AT MARTIN

MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGES

PRESENTS A FOREIGN FILM SERIES

(Spring 2000)




JANUARY 28: ESTAÇAO CENTRAL (CENTRAL STATION)

This heartwarming film does not offer any of the scenes that whet the wanderlust of tourists worldwide and bring them in droves to Brazil: viewers will have no glimpses of the mysterious rain forest of the Amazonas, no shots of the ultra-modern architecture of the capital city, Brazilia, and no breathtaking panoramas of the sun-drenched beaches of Rio de Janeiro. What this film does offer is an insider's view of "grassroots" Brazil and the everyday life of her people--and the story of an unforgettable young boy, Josué, who has the dream of tracking down a long-lost father. A chance encounter with a hardened, retired teacher, Dora, at Rio's bustling central rail station gives Josué the unlikely means to realize his dream. Moved by the boy's hope and determination, Dora undergoes a dramatic change in character, becoming selfless to the extent that she leaves everything behind to help her adopted "son" find his father. As they travel many miles into Brazil's heartland, Dora and Josué live through a string of adventures that show them the positive traits of their Brazilian compatriots and leave the viewer with renewed faith in the basic goodness of humankind. Directed by Walter Salles, Central Station features Vinicius de Oliveira and Fernanda Montenegro in the lead roles and won first prize at the Berlin Film Festival in 1998. (Color, 115 minutes, in Portuguese with English subtitles.) Introduced by Prof. Maria Malone (French and Portuguese).


FEBRUARY 25: DER HIMMEL BEI BERLIN (WINGS OF DESIRE)

This deliberately-paced, hauntingly-realized contemporary masterpiece, whose German title literally means "the sky or heaven above Berlin," is a political allegory for the reunification of Germany, an existential parable of the soul's search for connection, and a love story that is characterized by directness and simplicity. Set in a divided Berlin (circa 1987), Wings of Desire is the story of two angels, Damiel and Cassiel, who spend eternity exchanging daily observations, listening to peoples' thoughts, and comforting the dying. One day, while observing a circus rehearsal, Damiel falls in love with a French trapeze artist and wants to experience life as humans do. The various difficulties he has as he takes on human form and struggles to adapt to the "real" world will amuse and touch you. Widely regarded as Wim Wender's best film, Wings of Desire celebrates the simple pleasures of life and the inherent beauty in everyday occurrences. The angels are played by Bruno Ganz (Damiel) and Otto Sender (Cassiel); the American actor, Peter Falk, alias Columbo, also makes an appearance playing himself. (Color and black and white, 110 minutes, 1988, in German, French, and English.) Introduced by Prof. Nels Rogers (German).


MARCH 31: DON JUAN, MI AMOR (DON JUAN, MY LOVE)

It is the eve of All Saint's Day and the ghost of don Juan Tenorio, the world's greatest legendary lover, is raising from his grave in a cemetery in Seville, Spain. His soul has been trapped in Purgatory for 450 years--and each year he returns to earth for twenty-four hours, with the chance of performing a good deed which will free his spirit and allow him to go to heaven. All goes well in this zesty comedy until don Juan, the ghost, meets up by chance with an actor who has come to Seville to play don Juan in the classical Spanish play by Tirso de Molina--and to smuggle drugs into the country in his props! After this unplanned meeting, the movie unfolds its plot in a series of hilarious adventures, as the rival don Juans bump awkwardly into each other in the most unlikely spots: a police station, an insane asylum, on the stage--and in the boudoir. You'll have to come see for yourself which don Juan succeeds in his given mission-- before the day expires and the stroke of midnight puts an end to the capers for another year. Rossy de Palma, Loles Leon, and Maria Barranco star in this clever, multi-layed adaptation of the myth of don Juan, which is directed by Antonio Mercero. A word of caution: this film has brief nudity and adult language which some may find offensive. (Color, 1991, 96 minutes, in Spanish with English subtitles.) Introduced by Prof. Ingrid Padial (Spanish).


APRIL 28: LE HUITIEME JOUR (THE EIGHTH DAY)

What common needs and desires could make a successful, middle-aged bank executive (Harry) and a handicapped, institutionalized teenager (Georges) into inseparable buddies who, together, find the courage to face life's ups and downs? The Eighth Day will supply the answer to this intriguing question, along with poignant commentary on the stress the main characters undergo as they try to establish meaningful relationships with others while pressured by a fast- paced, impersonal modern world. As the film opens, Harry is suffering from professional burnout and family disconnect and is tottering on the brink of suicide. Rescue comes in the unlikely form of a youthful Georges, a victim of Downs syndrome, who shows Harry how to squeeze the most out of everyday life and teaches him the meaning of friendship and sacrifice. Winner of a prize at the 1997 Cannes film festival, this Franco-Belgian production stars Daniel Auteuil and Pascal Duquenne and was directed by Jaco Van Dormael. (Color, 108 minutes, 1997, in French with English subtitles.) Introduced by Prof. Norman Lillegard (Philosophy).



OPEN TO UTM FOREIGN LANGUAGE STUDENTS

INTENDED FOR THE ENRICHMENT OF OUR FOREIGN LANGUAGE CURRICULUM

ALL SHOWINGS AT 7:00 PM ON THE UT-MARTIN CAMPUS

IN THE GALLIEN AUDITORIUM IN GOOCH HALL

ALL FILMS IN ORIGINAL FOREIGN LANGUAGE WITH ENGLISH SUBTITLES

INTRODUCED BY UTM FACULTY

THE MFL FOREIGN FILM SERIES IS FUNDED BY THE SCHOOL OF ARTS & SCIENCES





You may also wish to check with our English Dapertment's Film Series.


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