D E P O T
Ideas for French Language & Culture
Advocacy in the US

  

Official Web Site of the AATF Commission on Advocacy
General Promotion & Advocacy for French Language & Culture


together with

French Advocacy Wiki
https://frenchadvocacy.wikispaces.com

AATF K-12 First-Responder Advocacy Kit
http://www.utm.edu/staff/globeg/responder/home.shtml



General Advocacy of French

Youtube - AATFrench
http://www.youtube.com/user/aatfrench

Youtube for Eastern Massachusetts AATF Chapter
http://www.youtube.com/user/aatfema

AATF -Rhode Island (Youtube channel)
http://www.youtube.com/user/AATFRI

Why Learn French? (Youtube video)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e3OBy8fSywU

You Wouldn't Know They Majored in French
http://www.utm.edu/staff/globeg/frenchdegree.html

French Combination Majors (by Institution) - new
http://www.utm.edu/staff/globeg/frcombo.shtml

French Matters (notes posted during Columbia U. webcast) - webcast video
http://www.utm.edu/staff/bobp/french/frmatters.html

Association France Etats-Unis
http://www.france-etatsunis.com/

Beyond Freedom Fries and Indignity: On Francophobia
http://www.utm.edu/staff/globeg/freedomfries.html

Canadian Parents for French
http://www.cpf.ca/

CODOFIL - Council for the Development of French in Louisiana
http://www.codofil.org/

Commission for the Promotion of French (AATF)
http://www.frenchteachers.org/hq/commissions.html#promo

Le Français . . . pas compliqué (comparative difficulty link list)
http://www.utm.edu/staff/globeg/ difficult.html

French - The Most Practical Foreign Language
http://www.fll.vt.edu/French/why-french/

In What ways is French a Gateway Language to the World (other videos on right)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PoMMS8KmfsU

MATERIALS CENTER (AATF Commission for the Promotion of French)
http://frenchteachers.org/hq/materials/material.htm

Miquelon.org
http://www.miquelon.org

Why learn French? (About.com)
http://french.about.com/od/whylearnfrench/Why_learn_French.htm

On the Importance of Knowing French
http://www.utm.edu/staff/globeg/profren.shtml

Organizations Promoting the Study of French
http://globegate.utm.edu/french/globegate_mirror/org.html

"Advocacy Lessons Learned," by Barbara Ransford
http://www.utm.edu/staff/globeg/legislate.htm

SuperFrenchie
http://superfrenchie.com/

Advocacy for French Programs
http://www.scoop.it/t/advocacy-for-french-programs




The administrator or politician who cannot recognize the importance of foreign language learning will be among the first to call for the elimination of a French program. Therefore, those who would call themselves advocates for French language and culture programs must first be foreign-language advocates.

Anyone who has tried to save a French program in distress, knows instinctively that there is a difference between promotion and advocacy. Promotion seems to speak universal truths about the value of language learning itself, or even the value of knowing a particular language and its cultures. Designed to increase visibility or desirability of that language and culture, it can be used to attract new learners, or to motivate those who are already learners. Promotion works best if there is national base of shared materials and information to be used on the local level by competent enthusiastic teachers. Of course these efforts can be enhanced by local data and materials. You promote like you advertise, because the world should know.

Language advocacy, on the other hand, generally treats identified specific and diverse problems associated with one or a set of language and culture programs in defined geographic locations. Within that context it seeks to influence public policy and resource allocation decisions of specific political, economic, and social systems and institutions. It generally occurs as a reaction to a program cut or plans to cut a program, and you do it because you have to.

The reasons for an advocacy call often seem local, stemming from the diversity inherent among American school districts. Here is why some French programs are cut: revolving door position in a school district, really poor teaching, French teacher fired for inappropriate activities, another language being substituted for French, reduction to Spanish, all foreign languages suffering at the same time, the way in which a particular district faces a state budget deficit, local tax support down, dwindling and unsustainable district enrollment, the politics of a dominant school board, PTO or booster club member, no practical need for French identified for that region, and pure, unadulterated agoraphobia.

One of the chief difficulties with advocacy is that since our need for it appears to arise largely from local situations, there is reluctance to develop centralized strategies, and many efforts, both successful and unsuccessful, have been built literally from scratch. However, along with local causes are often less obvious general ones. These include both ignorance of and misinterpretation of facts, like a world population of "native-speaking" Hispanics numerically superior to that native speakers of French, our current rash of jingoistic French bashing, with its racist overtones, our ignorance of the roles played by French speakers in US history, ignorance of the importance of French in the operation of international non-government organizations, the linguistic and cultural dynamics of globalized business (not just import-export, but component and process chaining, foreign-direct investment, etc.).

The AATF has a very good "Commission for the Promotion of French". When it was established in 1997, its main objective was "to help teachers recruit students by producing various documents such as flyers, guides, teaching ideas, and letters to convince students, parents, and administrators of the value of French." Many of the materials developed by the Task Force and the Commission are available through the AATF Materials Center. Regular dissemination of these materials by enthusiastic teachers will reduce the need for advocacy.

But wait, there's more. The Commission sponsors a regular feature in the National Bulletin entitled "Promotion in Motion." With a click on the "Promotion in Motion" section, I discovered Barbara Ransford's article, "Advocacy Lessons Learned" from a 2001 issue of the the AATF National Bulletin, and I began to learn of the AATF's concern for advocacy.

Since the loss of a French program often has a complex web of both local and non-local causes, since these may stem from community diversity reflected in all American educational programs and reactions to them, since they may also grow from the prejudice, ignorance and misinformation to which we are universally susceptible, it makes sense to create central resources on the national and state levels, and to implement a strategic framework that will work on the local level. In this way advocates will not reinvent the wheel, and there will exist the kind of systems redundancy that will allow for multiple arguments to aim at a variety of key individuals and groups.

Here are some suggestions on how to set this up, gathering pertinent information about a particular district and state. My caveat is that while it will be impossible to gather complete information in all the categories at one time, additional information may fall into place during stages of the advocacy process.


Local Level

Profiling School Districts where French programs are in trouble:
Identify and study troubled districts.
Find web sites for schools and the school board if possible.
Are school board meeting or PTO schedules available on line?
Are school board meeting or PTO minutes available on line?
Is a district school system report card available on line?
Find out if French is being cut to introduce another language.
Identify official reasons for cutting French programs.
Is this a partial cut (number of classes or levels) or complete cut?
Identify language dept. chair, language supervisor, general curriculum supervisor.
Identify state supervisor of foreign languages.
Find out if teachers are members of AATF or other language teaching organizations.
Identify AATF members closest to the troubled district.
Identify graduates who have benefited from the program (especially high-profile ones).
Identify students who really like the program.
Identify pro-French segments of PTO/PTA, faculty, and student body.
Identify guidance counselors, and find out how they stand on this issue.
Identify local and regional media (newspaper, radio, TV, web), with contact people.
identify the local mayor.
Identify local or regional allies (in businesses, political positions, colleges).
Identify language department & school of education in nearby colleges.
Identify any other educational organization for international education.
Identify nearest French, or Canadian consulate.
Identify nearest Alliance Française.
Identify and collate state-specific advocacy facts.
Identify French classes in strong districts willing to write letters supporting French in troubled districts.
Identify French-owned companies, French goods importers and exporters to francophone companies in the region.
Identify regional companies with branches in francophone countries (Is there someone who would come to speak or write a letter?).
Identify local native speakers willing to speak or write letters.
Identify exciting francophone cultural events in the regions of troubled districts.
Identify other extra-curricular opportunities for students in troubled districts.
What is the percentage of kids who go on to college from high school?
What is the district's financial status (any visible budget woes)?
What is the district's status with respect to "No Child Left Behind"?


State Level

State profiling
State Board of Education web site.
State Department of Education web site.
State Curriculum Specialist in charge.
State Teacher qualifications.
State teacher quality enhancement programs.
State Language Curriculum.
State Language Standards.
State legislature education committees on Foreign Languages.
State exit proficiency expectations or exams.
State High-School Graduation Requirements.
State Public College entrance expectations or requirements.
State School District Report Cards on line.
State Economic Development Department.
State Foreign Language Teaching Association.
State Senators and Representatives (contact information).
Does the above have an advocacy committee or program?
Identify AATF chapters in the state.
Identify nearest Alliance Française chapters in the state.
Are any state accredited online or dual credit French courses being offered?
In which districts of the French and Canadian Consulates is the state located (locate their web sites)?
What are the state's practices of district evaluation for "No Child Left Behind"?

An extremely important part of working at the state level is a web site making a comprehensive case for the benefits of knowing French within that state. In order to serve its several purposes it should have the kind of redundancy that would support several different arguments. Ideally, such a site might have information about any French language media either native to the state, trans-border or internet (for radio and television). The following resources may help state advocacy webmasters in this area:

      French-language newspapers published in the United States
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:French-language_newspapers_published_in_the_United_States

      French in Louisiana media
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louisiana_French#French_in_Louisiana_media

      Radio Louisianne
      http://www.radiolouisiane.com/welcome.htm

      Radio Jeunesse des Amériques
      http://radiojeunesse.org/

      European radio stations streaming live on the internet - France
      http://www.listenlive.eu/france.html

      Squid TV - France
      http://watch.squidtv.net/europe/france.html

      Squid TV - Canada
      http://watch.squidtv.net/americas/canada.html

It would be appropriate also to include information about frequent French or francophone cultural events (film, music festivals, famous art collections), demographic information about the state's francophone, cajun or French creole population, organizational support for French language or francophone cultures in the state (AATF and Alliance Française chapters, appropriate consulate offices, your state foreign language association) French or francophone moments in state history. For the important bottom-line issue of the French-speaking world in the state economy (import-export data, information on component and process chaining, foreign-direct investment, francophone tourists, etc.). In some cases, it might be impressive to include information about famous state residents who speak French. Finally, there should be a link to a national advocacy site.

State-Specific Sites for French Advocacy

    AATF ADVOCACY FACT-PACK FOR ARIZONA (URL will change soon)
    http://www.utm.edu/staff/globeg/azadvocacy.html

    Arkansas Needs French
    http://www.utm.edu/staff/globeg/arkfrench.html

    Colorado Needs French (PDF file)
    languages.colostate.edu/docs/colorado.pdf

    Idaho Needs French
    http://www.iatlc.org/downloads/Idahofactpack.htm

    Indiana Needs French
    http://www.infrenchteachers.org/indiana_needs_french.htm

    Kansas Needs French
    http://www.kfla.lawrence.com/aatffactpack.htm

    Kentucky AATF (click on advocacy links)
    http://www.french.kwla-online.org/

    Louisiana Needs French (temporary address)
    http://www.utm.edu/staff/globeg/louisiana.html

    AATF ADVOCACY FACT PACK FOR MAINE (temporary address)
    http://www.umaine.edu/flame/aatf_advocacy_fact_pack_for_main.htm

    Massachusetts Needs French
    http://www.faculty.umb.edu/brian_thompson/maneeds.htm

    AATF ADVOCACY FACT PACK FOR MICHIGAN (see "document promotionnel téléchargeable")
    http://www.utm.edu/staff/globeg/michigan.html

    Minnesota French Facts
    http://mnaatf.org/1d.htm

    Missouri French Facts (Microsoft Word document)
    http://flamnet.org/MOFrench.doc

    New Jersey Needs French
    http://www.utm.edu/staff/globeg/newjersey.html

    French in the Delaware Valley
    http://foreignlanguages.camden.rutgers.edu/french/why-french-matters/#Frenchinthedelawarevalley

    New York Needs French (state-specific data)
    http://www.utm.edu/staff/globeg/nyadvocat.html

    The Advocacy page for North Carolina-AATF
    http://www.ncaatf.org/advocacy.html

    AATF ADVOCACY FACT PACK FOR OHIO
    http://www3.uakron.edu/modlang/aatf/ohiofrench.html

        http://ms.loganhocking.k12.oh.us/~madame/ohiofrench.htm

    Rhode Island AATF - Advocacy Resources
    http://www.aatfri.com/advocacy resources/default.html

    Tennessee Needs French
    http://www.utm.edu/staff/globeg/frtnadvoc.shtml

    FRENCH ADVOCACY FOR VERMONT
    http://www.vfla.org/resources.html

    French in DC [advocacy+]
    https://melissakerley.wordpress.com/category/language-study-advocacy/

    West Virginia Needs French
    http://www.utm.edu/staff/globeg/frenchwv.html

    Wisconsin Needs French
    https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/alkhas/www/winfrench/


We have AATF Advocacy Fact Packs for the states above and for Alabama, California, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Iowa, Maryland, Mississippi, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Texas, Utah, US Virgin Islands, Virginia, West Virginia, and Wyoming. If your state is not on this list or one the list of state web sites and you have some advocacy needs, please contact us. Each state's page will be different in a variety of ways. For example, I did not have the celeb idea you see on the Tennessee page until I had done the New York page. Of course, as we progress AATF members will come up with new and better categories of information. Not every category will be relevant to targeted groups or individuals, but the categories exist because the information from each might be used in constructing an effective argument aimed at a particular group or key individual. Redundancy is the operative word here. The virtue of a plainly programmed and accessible web resource is its universal availability, and its potential for flexible service. Local advocates can create their own district-specific documents by selecting from the state page and adding their own local information. In our war against weak budgets, ignorance and agoraphobia, a web site like this is a weapon of mass instruction. Here are tutorials for two of many simple ways of making an informational web site using materials most people have or can get for free:

    Creating Web Pages Using Microsoft Word
    http://www.hartnell.edu/library/word_web_design/word_web_pages.htm

    Creating a Web page using Netscape Composer 7.x
    http://www.cameron.edu/~karenh/tutorials/Composer7.html

State and Chapter Coordinators

All AATF chapters will have their own advocacy coordinators, and this is what we would like them to do or "coordinate":

1. Work with other chapter members or with other chapters (in multi-chapter states) to make available state-specific advocacy materials on a web page.

2. Organize information pertinent to the status of French in their chapters. This might include some of the answers to queries in the district and state profile lists from

    Ideas for French Language & Culture Advocacy in the US
    http://www.utm.edu/staff/globeg/advofr.shtml

3. Maintain a name and address list of influential people in the chapter (state supervisors, state and national representatives and senators, allies in business, state foreign language association contacts, etc.).

4. Identify members and interested allies who are willing to travel and speak,

    Advocating for World Languages to Decision Makers Beyond the Choir
    http://community.actfl.org/actfl/communities/resources/viewdocument?DocumentKey=135618be-ca14-4b2e-a419-565a05d620b6

those who are willing to phone and those willing to write letters.

    Contacting Congress
    http://www.contactingthecongress.org/

    State Legislatures Internet Links
    http://www.ncsl.org/public/leglinks.cfm

5. Create, or be ready to create correspondence templates for letter writing campaigns.

6. Put the call out that you are interested in any sign that a French program will be cut, scaled back, replaced by something else, or that someone is struggling to introduce a French program in a district where there is none.

7. If possible, map out where chapter members are geographically, so you can call on those near trouble spots.

8. Share ideas, success and failure stories with other chapters.


French Language & Culture Organizations

    Alliance Française USA
    http://www.afusa.org/

    American Association of Teachers of French
    http://www.frenchteachers.org

    FACE - French American Cultural Exchange
    http://www.facecouncil.org/

    French Culture and Education in the USA
    http://www.frenchculture.org

    French meet-up groups
    http://french.meetup.com/all/

Francophone Government Offices in the US


    Belgian Consular Representatives in the US
    http://www.diplobel.us/

    Canadian Government offices in the US
    http://www.canadainternational.gc.ca/washington/offices-bureaux/index.aspx?view=d

    Quebec in the USA
    http://www.gouv.qc.ca/portail/quebec/international/usa/

    French Embassy (see Consular Offices in the US)
    http://www.ambafrance-us.org/spip.php?rubrique=2

National, State, and District Education Information

    American School Counselor Association
    http://www.schoolcounselor.org/

    Ecoles françaises aux Etats Unis
    http://www.expat-blog.com/fr/guide/amerique-du-nord/etats-unis/773-ecoles-francaises-aux-etats-unis.html   

    International Baccalaureate Organization Schools Directory
    http://www.ibo.org/ibo/index.cfm?page=/ibo/services/ib_worldschool/school_dir&language=EN

    Directory of Two-Way Bilingual Immersion Programs in the U.S.
    http://www.cal.org/jsp/TWI/SchoolListings.jsp

    Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System
    http://nces.ed.gov/IPEDS/

    National Association of District Supervisors of Foreign Languages
    http://www.nadsfl.org/

    National Council of State Supervisors of Foreign Languages
    http://www.ncssfl.org/

    Search for Public School Districts
    http://nces.ed.gov/ccd/districtsearch/

    State and Local Foreign Language Standards
    http://www.utm.edu/staff/globeg/flstand.shtml

    State Education Agency (State Department of Education)
    http://wdcrobcolp01.ed.gov/Programs/EROD/org_list.cfm?category_ID=SEA

    State General Foreign Language Teaching Organizations
    http://www.utm.edu/staff/globeg/stateflto.html

French-Speaking & French Ancestry Demographics

    French America
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_America

    The French in America
    http://www.utm.edu/staff/globeg/francestry.htm

    US Census Bureau Language Use Data
    http://www.census.gov/population/www/socdemo/lang_use.html

    MLA Language Map Data Center
    http://www.mla.org/map_data

    The Modern Language Association Language Map
    http://www.mla.org/census_main

    Datanet Mapping -- 2000 Census U.S. Ancestry and Race
    http://www.lmic.state.mn.us/datanetweb/php/census2000/usAncestry.php

    Assemblée des Français à l'Etranger
    http://www.assemblee-afe.fr/

    Union des Français à l'Etranger
    http://www.ufe.asso.fr/

French Moments in Sate History


    These may give you a start.

    Acadian Deportation Ships
    http://www.acadian-home.org/deportationships.html

    France in America/ France en Amérique
    http://lcweb2.loc.gov/intldl/fiahtml/fiahome.html

    Franco-American History
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:French-American_history
   
    French-American Relations (French Embassy)
    http://ambafrance-us.org/spip.php?rubrique100

    French Canadian Emigration to the United States 1848-1930
    http://faculty.marianopolis.edu/c.belanger/quebechistory/readings/leaving.htm

    Links to Franco-American Cultural and Historical Facts
    http://www.utm.edu/staff/bobp/french/francoamerican.html

Finding French Place Names

    French Place-Names in the United States
    http://franceusa.blogspot.com/2008/01/french-place-names-in-united-states.html

    3. Geographical Names
    http://www.bartleby.com/185/50.html

    List of U.S. place names of French origin
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_U.S._place_names_of_French_origin

    USA Place Names Gazetteer
    http://www.placenames.com/us/

Export & Import Statistics

    Export.gov
    http://www.export.gov/

    List of Foreign Trade Zones by State
    http://ia.ita.doc.gov/ftzpage/letters/ftzlist-map.html

    Small Business Association Trade Mission Online (Target Search)
    http://www.sba.gov/about-offices-content/1/2889/resources/13179

    Trade Stats Express
    http://tse.export.gov/

    US Census Bureau Foreign Trade Statistics
    http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/statistics/state/

    US Department of Commerce -Exports, Jobs, and Foreign Investment
    http://ita.doc.gov/td/industry/otea/state_reports/index.html

    US-French Commercial Ties (CRS report for Congress, July 7 2004)
    http://fpc.state.gov/documents/organization/39335.pdf

Foreign-direct investment

    Business Services Industry - G. Investment tables
    http://www.bea.gov/scb/pdf/2012/12%20December/D Pages/1212dpg_g.pdf

    fDi Intelligence
    http://www.fdiintelligence.com/

    Foreign Direct Investment database
    http://www.cepii.com/anglaisgraph/bdd/fdi.htm

    Foreign Direct Investment in the U.S.: Financial and Operating Data for U.S. Affiliates of Foreign Multinational Companies
    http://www.bea.gov/international/di1fdiop.htm

    Foreign Ownership of U.S. Farmland
    http://www.propertyrightsresearch.org/foreign_ownership_of_u.htm

    French-Speaking Business Connections in America (chambers of commerce)
    http://www.utm.edu/staff/globeg/frenchbus.shtml

    French Companies and Products in the United States
    http://tsdfrench.wikispaces.com/file/view/Flyer_FrenchCompanies&ProductsInUS_Miles.doc

    International Surveys: Foreign Direct Investment in the United States
    http://www.bea.gov/surveys/fdiusurv.htm

    Organization for International Investment
    http://www.ofii.org/

Canadian-American Business Support

    American Chamber of Commerce in Canada
    http://www.amchamcanada.ca/

    Canadian Embassy State Trade Fact Sheets (2008)
    http://www.canadainternational.gc.ca/washington/commerce_can/2008/index.aspx?lang=eng

    Canadian Investment Review (with search)
    http://www.investmentreview.com/

    Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada
    http://www.international.gc.ca/

    Transborder Surface Freight Data (Bureau of Transportation statistics CA/US)
    http://transborder.bts.gov/programs/international/transborder/TBDR_QA.html

French-American Business Support

    Ambassade de France - Mission Economique (Etats-Unis)
    http://www.dree.org/etatsunis/

    The French Suppliers Directory and UBIFRANCE Portal
    http://www.ubifrance.com/

    French-American Chamber of Commerce
    http://www.faccsf.com/

            French-Amercan Chamber of Commerce "Chattanooga Branch"
            http://www.facc-atlanta.com/who-we-are/chattanooga-branch/

    UBIFRANCE (French Agency for international business development)
    http://www.ubifrance.com/

Locating French-speaking celebs

    THE LANGUAGE OF THE STARS
    http://www.utm.edu/staff/globeg/celebfrench.shtml

General Foreign Language Advocacy


    National Level

    Joint National Committee for Languages (JNCL) and the National Council for Languages and International Studies (NCLIS)
    http://www.languagepolicy.org/

    Global Involvement
    http://www.languagepolicy.org/advocacy/index.html

    American Association of University Supervisors and Coordinators - Advocacy Forum
    http://www.aausc.org/forum?mode=MessageList&eid=328962

    Foreign Language Advocacy (ACTFL)
    http://www.actfl.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=3656

    Foreign Languages: An Essential Core Experience
    http://www.utm.edu/staff/bobp/french/flsat.html

    DOD National Language Conference Results Announced (security needs)
    http://www.defense.gov/Releases/Release.aspx?ReleaseID=7506

    Foreign Language Advocacy (Center for Applied Linguistice)
    http://www.cal.org/resources/archive/digest/1990advocacy.html

    Saveourforeignlanguages's Blog
    http://saveourforeignlanguages.wordpress.com/

    Why learn another language? - Knowing other language brings opportunities
    http://www.adfl.org/resources/knowing_other_languages.htm

    $$World Languages = Career Opportunities$$ - new
    http://www.utm.edu/staff/bobp/french/forlang=$.html

    Regional Level

    Advocacy - Central States Conference on the Teaching of Foreign Languages
    http://www.csctfl.org/17states.html

    Southern Conference on Language Teaching - Foreign Language Advocacy
    http://scolt.webnode.com/advocacy-for-world-languages/

    Advocacy for languages in the SWCOLT region
    http://www.swcolt.org/AdvocayReport.pdf

    State Level

    The California Language Teachers Association Foreign Language Advocacy Committee
    http://www.clta.net/advocacy/

    Connecticut Council of Language Teachers - Advocacy
    http://www.ctcolt.org/pages/advocacy.asp

    Florida Foreign Language Association - Advocacy
    http://ffla.us/page.php?page_id=11

    Foreign Language Association of Georgia - Advocacy for Foreign Languages
    http://www.flageorgia.org/advocacy.htm

    Georgia Coalition for Language Learning
    http://www.gsu.edu/%7Ewwwgcl/

    Iowa World Language Advocacy (sidebar)
    http://www.iwla.net/Default.aspx?pageId=797182

    Kansas World Language Association - Advocacy Resources
    http://www.kswla.org/advocacy.htm

    Kentucky Woirld Language Association Advocacy
    http://www.kwla-online.org/advocacy/index.html

    Massachusetts Foreign Language Association (Advocacy on tool bar)
    http://mafla.org/

    Foreign Language Association of Missouri - Foreign Language Advocacy
    http://www.flamnet.org/fl_advocacy.html
     
    A Report on the State of World Languages - State of New Jersey
    http://www.state.nj.us/education/aps/cccs/wl/stateofwl.pdf

    Local Advocacy for Second Language Education: A Case Study in New Mexico. ERIC Digest
    http://www.ericdigests.org/pre-9218/local.htm

    NYSAFLT Foreign Language Advocacy
    http://www.nysaflt.org/advocacy/

    The Alliance for Language Learning (FLANC)
    http://www.allianceforlanguagelearning.org/

    Foreign Language Advocacy - The Ohio Foreign Language Association
    http://www.ofla-online.org/index.php/advocacy

    OASIS - Oklahoma Association Supporting International Studies
    http://www.okhighered.org/oasis/

    World Language Advocacy (PSMLA)
    http://www.psmla.net/psmla_031.htm

    South Carolina Foreign Language Teachers' Association - Advocacy
    http://www.scflta.org/advocacy/Advocacy.html

    Why study a foreign language in Tennessee?
    http://www.utm.edu/departments/french/why.html

    Texas Foreign Language Association - Advocacy
    http://www.tfla.info/tfla_advocacy/

    Vermont Foreign Language Association Advocacy Section
    http://www.vfla.org/resources.html

    Foreign Language Association of Virginia Advocacy Page
    http://www.flavaweb.org/flava_advocacy.php

    West Virginia Foreign Language Association - World Language Advocacy
    http://www.wvflta.org/Websites/page.aspx?page=World+Language+Advocacy

    Glastonbury Foreign Languages - Advocacy
    https://www.glastonburyus.org/curriculum/foreignlanguage/advocate/Pages/default.aspx


Advocacy for French Language and Culture programs in the US cannot be characterized as a naming of celebs who speak French, executives who find it to be an essential tool, or by writing letters to politicians, though these may all wind up in the mix. Clearly, efforts will involve organization from the national to the local level. Topics addressed in advocacy discourse will be both in and outside of language education, with some entirely unrelated to education. In this war, advocates may need an air campaign of letters, but they will also need "boots on the ground" in local supporters, willing to show up at PTO and school board meetings. Therefore, they will work with other educators, students, parents, alumni, school board members, city officials and other politicians, people from the regional and local business communities, newspaper other media employees.

Advocacy is of great importance to the AATF, in a climate where French enrollments show little growth on the college level, and where a number of high-school programs are being eliminated. My suggestion is that our efforts be centered in the "Commission for the Promotion of French", but that they involve regular interaction with the other commissions. In addition, we need to identify AATF members who are also active members of other language teaching or general educators organizations. Some of these organizations have developed effective advocacy strategies which we might use, and AATF members connected to them would be of important liaison value. Third, we need to learn how to approach and enlist the help of individuals and organizations outside of academe.

In doing all of this, we will have to get more members involved. Each AATF member, even with a small contribution of effort, can be a part of a successful collective support effort, which I will outline in the next few months. If I am successful, part of the plan I outline should come from you.


Advocacy for French Language and Culture programs in the US cannot be characterized as a naming of celebs who speak French, executives who find it to be an essential tool, or by writing letters to politicians, though these may all wind up in the mix. Clearly, efforts will involve organization from the national to the local level. Topics addressed in advocacy discourse will be both in and outside of language education, with some entirely unrelated to education. In this war, advocates may need an air campaign of letters, but they will also need "boots on the ground" in local supporters, willing to show up at PTO and school board meetings. Therefore, they will work with other educators, students, parents, alumni, school board members, city officials and other politicians, people from the regional and local business communities, newspaper other media employees.

Advocacy is of great importance to the AATF, in a climate where French enrollments show little growth on the college level, and where a number of high-school programs are being eliminated. My suggestion is that our efforts be centered in the "Commission for the Promotion of French", but that they involve regular interaction with the other commissions. In addition, we need to identify AATF members who are also active members of other language teaching or general educators organizations. Some of these organizations have developed effective advocacy strategies which we might use, and AATF members connected to them would be of important liaison value. Third, we need to learn how to approach and enlist the help of individuals and organizations outside of academe.

In doing all of this, we will have to get more members involved. Each AATF member, even with a small contribution of effort, can be a part of a successful collective support effort, which I will outline in the next few months. If I am successful, part of the plan I outline should come from you.

Email questions to TennesseeBob Peckham: bobp@utm.edu




AATF advocacy in a nutshell (Q & A / summary)
Vital Advocacy: Information, Alliances and Program Presence

See the AATF's "French Advocacy Events".

Produced by The Globe-Gate Project
Made in Tennessee to bring you the world
TennesseeBob Peckham, Director
bobp@utm.edu

42353