Globe-Gate CALL Research Center

updated March 2006



INTRODUCTION

Unless language teachers are willing to hand part of the learning load over to students and appropriate media (analog and digital recorded material, software, TV, radio) several negative things are destined to occur. 1) Students will be more likely to depend on their teachers and a book to learn, and will not become independent learners. 2) The learning process will not attain its potential efficiency. 3) Everything outside the teacher and the book will become "ancillary" (=nice little extras). 4) Students will protest the fact that they paid so much for "ancillaries". 5) Every native target-language speaker will sound oddly unlike their teacher's model.

When teachers hand part of the learning load over to students and appropriate media, participants in the learning community are blessed in some very positive ways: 1) The media brings learners closer to the reality in which they must eventually immerse themselves...much more real than the teacher and the textbook. 2) It brings not only a variety of native target-language speakers into the mix, but it can also present a visual context filled with learnable gestures and memorable cultural icons. 3) It can insist that each student have good answers for all questions. 4) It can offer learning situations presented in several different ways, thereby accommodating different learning styles. 5) If the media is truly integrated, either by its designers or the manipulation of the instructor (visual, situational, lexical and grammatical links with the rest of the program, part of the homework grade, and on the test), students will not question why they had to pay for it. 6) That appropriate media matched with appropriate expectations can be a very adequate substitution for seat time, is proven by the many studies summarized in the following web sites:

The "No Significant Difference Phenomenon"

Significant Difference (NCAT studies)

We hope that the material presented in our "Globe-Gate CALL Research Center" will guide you to open a window of opportunity for a positive difference through a balanced program, including a valid partnership between student and media.

See our Digital Direction in Language Lab Development



TECHNOLOGY ASSISTED LANGUAGE LEARNING BIBLIOGRAPHIES




CALL JOURNALS & NEWSLETTERS




LANGUAGE LEARNING SOFTWARE (locating, reviewing)

    Globe-Gate Research has created a comprehensive software and web review site, where the links lead to reviews of foreign-language education electronic resources. It is meant to serve the needs of both independent and institutional learners:

    Foreign-Language Software & Web Central




CALL ORGANIZATIONS & INSTITUTIONS




COMPUTERS AND LANGUAGE LEARNING




THE INTERNET AND LANGUAGE LEARNING




Distance Learning & Foreign Language Education




COMPUTERS PROCESSING LANGUAGE




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bobp@utm.edu
TennesseeBob Peckham
Director, The Globe-Gate Project
University of Tennessee-Martin
25774