American Association of Teachers of French - 87e Congrès annuel (8-11 juillet 2015)

le jeudi 9 juillet

Heure: 15h15-15h45

Salle:  Tente

S242: Chantons la Nouvelle France

Intervenants: Karen Sorenson (Austin Peay State University)
TennesseeBob Peckham, University of Tennessee at Martin (emeritus)

NEW - On Nov. 19, 2015, at Samford University in Birmingham, AL, we were joined by World Languages chair, Mike Ledgerwood in singing several songs from the program:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=el22FHMhHFE

A sing-along/concert by the vocal-instrumental duet, Au Coeur du Vent [https://www.utm.edu/staff/globeg/atelmusique.shtml] to celebrate French-language music sung from Louisiana to Saguenay, using a song-book made for the occasion. The performers will link as many instrumental versions of the songs as we can to our Web site so that you can have your students sing them in class. Sometimes we must go further than books, films, Internet, travel, etc. in our conviction about Francophone cultures. From the brain to the heart, from the heart to the voice, we sing about love, childhood, diaspora, hardship.

Public: général


Au Coeur du Vent is a French-language vocal-instrumental group (most often a duet) from Tennessee, Dr. Karen Sorenson from Austin Peay State University and TennesseeBob Peckham, emeritus from the University of Tennessee at Martin, both AATF members . We are two teachers, who have tried to give students a chance to sing and persuade other French teachers of the benefits having their students sing. We have performed together at immersion weekends and conferences, though as individuals, we have had public singing experience on radio and television, recordings, at clubs and in other groups. When I was at Middlebury, this was part of our immersion success, and Karen brings students up to an immersion program at the Université de Québec à Chicoutimi, where this activity is part of their experience. We will sing by category and by region, some traditional and some popular music, from composers like Zachary Richard.

Songs build idiomatic and contextual vocabulary. They can help students identify discourse units (phrases, sentences, verses). Singing a variety of songs assists in building topic strength. Imitation of rhythm, pitch, syllabification, intonation, length improves speech prosody. Theme development by verse encourages interest in the development and refinement of meaning.  But, only by singing them do you get the full benefit.


LIST OF SONGS (with links to online recordings)chansonnier in PDF  lyrics projection  

"Quatre vents, quatre océans"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IM8zopCX9fY

"Un canadien errant"
http://ingeb.org/songs/uncanadi.html

"Lac Bijou"
http://www.zacharyrichard.com/videos/lacbijou.html

"Marjolaine"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SF4ESN8GAGE

"Gens du pays"
http://download.efmidi.com/midi-25757-download-gilles_vigneault-gens_du_pays.html

"Saguenay des Voyages"
http://www.utm.edu/staff/bobp/french/saguenay.mp3

"Mon bateau de papier"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y6AE_-vSWe8

"C'est l'aviron"
http://ingeb.org/songs/aviron.html

"Jai une chanson dans mon coeur"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=09OBsnhV8YA

We might not be able to sing through all of these in our half hour.


Produced by Globe-Gate Research
Made in Tennessee to bring you the world
TennesseeBob Peckham, PhD, Director
bobp@utm.edu

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