The UTM Office of Disability Services seeks to establish an inclusive environment where every aspect of the university experience is readily accessible for all students without barriers or bias. Students may register with the Office of Disability Services to receive accommodations necessary to provide equitable access to courses and related activities. Once registered, students utilize the AIM Student Portal to request and manage most accommodations. Each student is also assigned an ODS Coordinator who serves as their point of contact for any questions or concerns related to their accommodations.

* Please note that it can take up to 30 calendar days to completely process an application request for initial services or add on accommodations. Please email our office at disabilityservices@utm.edu or reach out to Disability Coordinator at 731.881.7605 to discuss your specific needs.

Who is Eligible for Assistance?

Transitioning to College & Self Identification

Unlike high school, college students need to self-identify or disclose their disability to the ODS in order to receive accommodations and services. Students are responsible for obtaining and providing documentation that verifies their disability.

A "person with a disability" is someone with a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities. A person is considered to be a person with a disability if he/she has the disability, has a record of the disability, or is regarded as having the disability.

The following list is not limited to the common disabilities an individual maybe eligible for:

  • Blind and/or Visually Impaired
  • Deaf and/or Hard of Hearing
  • Learning Disabled/ Attention Deficit Disorder
  • Mobility Impaired
  • Neurologically Impaired
  • Chronic health conditions
  • Psychological

If you think the Office of Disability Services is right for you, fill out our Student Application and make your first move toward independence

Transitioning from a high school to a higher education institution

How to Register for Services

Students can register with ODS at any point during their college experience. To submit official accommodation request(s), follow the steps below. If you need further assistance, don't hesitate to reach out to ODS.

Complete the online Registration Form for Academic Accommodations prior to your appointment. Please be sure to include as many details as possible. You will be able to upload a copy of your documentation on the form. The following formats are preferred: Word, PDF, Text or RTF file.

If you require accommodations for on-campus housing, please complete the Housing Accommodations Application to initiate a request. Approved housing accommodations are provided on a first come first served basis and are based on the housing options available at the time of approval.

Students with dietary restrictions who may require an accommodation, are encouraged to complete the Dining Accommodations Request Form.

Please contact ODS at diabilityservices@utm.edu or at 731.881.7195 to schedule an Access Planning Meeting (APM) Meeting with the Disability Coordinator. The Coordinator will talk with you about your accommodation needs and begin to develop an accommodations plan with you.

Review the applicable ODS documentation guidelines for more information about what should be included. Students who require additional testing for Learning Disabilities or Attention Deficit Disorders may contact ODS for options in the West Tennessee area.

PLEASE NOTE: You should not delay meeting with ODS out of concern for not having the correct (or any) documentation. If needed, the Coordinator can discuss with you any specific documentation needs during your Access Planning Meeting (APM). Our priority is on meeting with you and providing accommodations as soon as possible. Provisional accommodations may be provided to allow students time to procure any needed documentation.

Please click on the links below for the UTM Disability Services Forms:

Please remember: Our priority is on meeting with students and beginning the accommodations process for them as soon as possible. Please do not delay meeting with ODS out of concern for not having the correct (or any) documentation. If applicable, the Coordinator will discuss with the student any specific documentation that is still needed during the Access Planning Meeting (APM).

Provisional accommodations may be provided to allow students time to procure any needed documentation. 

All documentation is confidential.

Attend Welcome Meeting

During the Access Planning Meeting (APM), the Coordinator will engage you in an interactive conversation about how your disability impacts you, as well as the accommodations needed to address that impact.

Satellite Campuses

The UTM Office of Disability Services at the University of Tennessee at Martin may conduct a virtual Welcome Meeting once a student has submitted a Registration Form.

The Coordinator will evaluate any documentation presented in advance of the Access Planning Meeting (APM), as well as discuss any additional documentation presented by you at the time of the Access Planning Meeting (APM). Our goal is to ensure that you have equal access to all courses and activities at UT in as timely a manner as possible.

Documentation Guidelines & Forms

Please click on the links below for the UTM Disability Services Forms:

Documentation Guidelines

All documentation must be on a letterhead, typed, and dated in the form of a letter, report, psychological evaluation, or a high school IEP/504 plan. At the very minimum, the reports should include the information as listed below. The professional documenting the disability must be identified by name, title, and professional credentials; license or certification; area of specialty; and the state/province in which the professional practices.

The American with Disabilities Act, (Public Law 101-336, 1990) defines a disability as a physical or psychological impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities, (i.e., learning, walking, talking, seeing, hearing, taking care of one’s self). The provision of reasonable accommodations is based on an assessment of the current impact of the student’s disability. As the manifestations of a disability may vary over time and in different settings, in most cases evaluations should have been conducted within the past year (i.e., low vision or neuromuscular conditions are often subject to change and should be updated for current functioning). Documentation should validate the need for services based on the individual’s current level of functioning in the educational setting.

Documentation must be current (generally, within three (3) years) and must include the following:

  • Exact diagnosis of the disability
  • Degree of current functioning loss
  • Limitations of the disability and its effect on the student’s ability to learn
  • A recommendation for the types of accommodations needed
  • If medications are taken, these should be clearly stated, as well as any potential side effects the medications may cause.

Guidelines for Documenting Disability by Category

In order to provide services to students with disabilities, the University is asking for voluntary self-identification of students with a specific disability. This information will be kept confidential and will be used for the purpose of aiding you, the student, to achieve your fullest potential while enrolled in postsecondary education.

Attention Deficit/Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD or Attention Deficit Disorder [ADD])

Documentation should be in the form of a formal letter or medical report. The diagnostic report should include the following components:

  • Summary of assessment procedures and evaluation instruments used to determine the diagnosis. A summary from a physician who has been treating the student for ADHD/ADD is also acceptable.
  • History of symptoms
  • Severity of the disorder
  • Information regarding medications prescribed and possible side effects that may impact the student’s academic performance
  • Information describing current functional limitations or barriers within the academic environment and other settings (How does ADHD/ADD affect the student’s ability to learn?)
  • Recommendations for reasonable accommodations that will help the student succeed within an academic setting

Autism Spectrum Disorder

Documentation should be in the form of an evaluation, formal letter, or medical report. The diagnostic report should include the following components:

  • Summary of assessment procedures and evaluation instruments used to determine the diagnosis. A summary from a physician who has been treating the student is also acceptable.
  • History of symptoms
  • Severity of the disorder
  • Information regarding medications prescribed and possible side effects that may impact the student’s academic performance
  • Information describing current functional limitations or barriers within the academic environment and other settings (How does the Asperger’s or Autism Spectrum affect the student’s ability to learn?)
  • Recommendations for reasonable accommodations that will help the student succeed within an academic setting

Blind or Low Vision

Documentation should be in the form of an evaluation or medical letter from an ophthalmologist or optometristThe diagnostic report should include the following components:

  • Letter or documentation from an agency specializing in working with and assisting individuals who are blind or have low vision (Division of Blind Services)
  • History and severity of symptoms
  • Information regarding functional limitations or barriers connected to the student’s vision loss within the academic setting (How does vision loss or blindness impair the student’s ability to learn?)
  • If relevant, a description of the expected progression or stability of the impact of the condition over time
  • An ocular assessment or evaluation from an ophthalmologist or low-vision evaluation of residual visual function that, where appropriate, should assess the student’s visual loss both with and without the use of mitigating measures, such as the use of eyeglasses or other sensory devices
  • Recommendations for reasonable accommodations that will help the student succeed within an academic setting
  • Visual impairment is defined by the State of Florida as disorders in the structure and function of the eye as manifested by at least one of the following: visual acuity of 20/70 or less in the better eye after the best possible correction, a peripheral field so constricted that it affects one’s ability to function in an educational setting, or a progressive loss of vision which may affect one’s ability to function in an educational setting. Examples include, but are not limited to, cataracts, glaucoma, nystagmus, retinal detachment, retinitis pigmentosa, and strabismus.

 Deaf or Hard of Hearing

Documentation should be in the form of an evaluation or audiology report. The diagnostic report should include the following components:

  • Letter or report from an audiologist or otolaryngologist
  • History and severity of symptoms
  • Severity of the disorder
  • Information regarding medications prescribed and possible side effects that may impact the student’s academic performance
  • Information describing current functional limitations or barriers within the academic environment and other settings (How does the deafness or hard of hearing affect the student’s ability to learn?)
  • An audiological evaluation and/or audiogram which should assess the student’s hearing loss (dB levels) both with and without the use of mitigating measures, such as the use of hearing aids
  • Recommendations for reasonable accommodations that will help the student succeed within an academic setting (sign language interpreter, real-time captioning, note-takers, etc.)
  • A hearing impairment is defined by the state of Florida as a loss of thirty (30) decibels or greater, pure tone average of 500, 1000, and 4000 (Hz), unaided, in the better ear. Examples include, but are not limited to, conductive hearing impairment or deafness, sensorineural hearing impairment or deafness, high or low tone hearing loss or deafness, and acoustic trauma hearing loss or deafness.

Orthopedic Impairment

Documentation should be in the form of a formal letter or medical report. The diagnostic report should include the following components:

  • Letter from a physician qualified to diagnose and treat the condition
  • Identification of the specific orthopedic condition preferred
  • History of presenting symptoms
  • Duration and severity of the impairment
  • Information about side effects of medication currently prescribed
  • Information describing current functional limitations or barriers within the academic environment and other settings (How does the disability impair the student from learning?)
  • Recommendations for reasonable accommodations that will help the student succeed within an academic setting

 Other Health Disabilities

Documentation should be in the form of a formal letter or medical report. The diagnostic report should include the following components:

  • Letter from a physician qualified to diagnose and treat the condition
  • Identification of the specific medical condition preferred
  • History and severity of the condition
  • Information regarding medications prescribed and possible side effects that may impact the student’s academic performance
  • Information describing current functional limitations or barriers within the academic environment and other settings (How does the disability impair the student from learning?)
  • Recommendations for reasonable accommodations that will help the student succeed within an academic setting

Psychological/Emotional/Behavioral Disability

Documentation should be in the form of a formal letter or medical report. The diagnostic report should include the following components:

  • Letter from a physician, psychologist, psychiatrist, licensed social worker, or licensed mental health counselor qualified to diagnose and treat the condition
  • History of symptoms
  • Duration and severity of the disorder
  • Identification of a specific psychological, emotional, or behavioral disability preferred
  • Information regarding medications prescribed and possible side effects that may impact the student’s academic performance
  • Information describing current functional limitations or barriers within the academic environment and other settings (How does the disability impair the student from learning?)
  • Recommendations for reasonable accommodations that will help the student succeed within an academic setting

Specific Learning Disability

Documentation should be in the form of a psychological evaluation. The diagnostic report should include the following components:

  • Psycho-educational evaluation or neuro-psychological evaluation
  • A specific diagnosis preferred
  • History of symptoms
  • Duration and severity of symptoms
  • Evaluations based on adult norms preferred
  • IQ evaluation narrative, scores, and sub-test scores are helpful in determining reasonable accommodations.
  • Information regarding medications prescribed and possible side effects that may impact the student’s academic performance
  • Information describing current functional limitations or barriers within the academic environment and other settings (How does the disability impair the student from learning?)
  • Recommendations for reasonable accommodations that will help the student succeed within an academic setting

Specific Learning Disability Definition

A disorder in one or more of the basic psychological or neurological processes involved in understanding or in using spoken or written language. Disorders may be manifested in listening, thinking, reading, writing, spelling, or performing arithmetic calculations. Examples include dyslexia, dysgraphia, dysphasia, dyscalculia, and other specific learning disabilities in the basic psychological or neurological processes. Such disorders do not include learning problems, which are due primarily to visual, hearing, physical, or intellectual disability, to emotional disturbance, or to an environmental deprivation.

Assessment

The neuropsychological or psycho-educational evaluation for the diagnosis of a specific learning disability must provide clear and specific evidence that a learning disability does or does not exist. The assessment and any resulting diagnosis should consist of and be based on a comprehensive assessment battery, which does not rely on any one test or subtest. Evidence of a substantial limitation to learning or other major life activity must be provided.

Tests for Assessing Adolescents and Adults

When selecting a battery of tests, it is critical to consider the technical adequacy of instruments including their reliability, validity, and standardization on an appropriate norm group. The following list states the recommended tests for screening specific learning disabilities:

Aptitude

  • Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale – IV (WAIS-IV)
  • Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale (5thedition)

Academic Achievement

  • Woodcock-Johnson Test of Achievement – Third Edition
  • Wechsler Individual Achievement Test (WIAT) or specific achievement tests, such as Nelson-Denny Reading Skills Test
  • Stanford Diagnostics Mathematics Test
  • Test of Written Language (TOWL 4)
  • Woodcock Reading Mastery Tests – Third Edition

Information Processing

  • Woodcock-Johnson Test of Cognitive Abilities – Third Edition

IQ Evaluation

  • Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-IV)
  • Reynolds (RAIS)

Other Documentation Accepted

An IEP (Individualized Education Plan) will be accepted for basic accommodations (i.e., extended time on tests and in-class assignments and use of a tape recorder). The IEP must have a diagnosis and signature page.

Speech and Language Impairment

Documentation should be in the form of an evaluation or formal letter from a speech pathologist. The diagnostic report should include the following components:

  • Letter from a physician or practitioner qualified to diagnose and treat the disorder
  • History of symptoms
  • Duration and severity of impairment
  • Information describing current functional limitations or barriers within the academic environment and other settings (How does the disability impair the student from learning?)
  • Recommendations for reasonable accommodations that will help the student succeed within an academic setting

Traumatic Brain Injury

Documentation should be in the form of an evaluation, formal letter, or medical report. The diagnostic report should include the following components:

  • Psycho-educational evaluation; neuro-psychological evaluation; cognitive- processing narrative, scores, and sub-test scores; and IQ evaluation narrative, scores, and sub-test scores are helpful when determining reasonable accommodations.
  • History of presenting symptoms
  • Relevant medical and medication history
  • Duration and severity of injury
  • Information regarding medications prescribed and possible side effects that may impact the student’s academic performance
  • Information describing current functional limitations or barriers within the academic environment and other settings (How does the disability impair the student from learning?)
  • Recommendations for reasonable accommodations that will help the student succeed within an academic setting
AIM Portal

AIM Portal

AIM Management System

As our team is here to assist our students with reasonable accommodations, our AIM Management System helps ease our registration process for new students and better the overall experience for our current students and their faculty and staff. AIM is an online accommodation management portal that facilitates interaction with the ODS, faculty, staff and students. Students will independently coordinate their accommodations. The system protects confidential information about the students and allows for streamlined communication between students, faculty and staff.

About AIM

Accessible Information Management (AIM) is a web-based tool for Wright State students registered with the Office of Disability Services. AIM currently provides students the following services:

  • Request ODS services each semester
  • Electronically e-mail accommodation letters to your professors
  • Schedule any exams or quizzes that you want to complete in the ODS Exam Hub

Why do I need to use AIM?

You must request accommodations each semester through AIM in order to ensure the most effective implementation of your accommodations.

Please make sure to request your accommodations in a timely manner, as some accommodations require advanced preparation and planning.

Professors are not obligated to provide you with classroom accommodations if you have not provided your official ODS accommodation letter.

Unless requested by the student registered with ODS, faculty members receive no notification of your registration status at ODS or your accommodations.

Accommodation letters can be requested and e-mailed to you and to your professors upon your request through AIM.

Faculty cannot request verification of accommodations directly from ODS.
Every semester, students must complete the following in AIM:

Request Accommodations

  • Acknowledge ODS policies
  • Send Accommodation Letters to Faculty
  • Schedule ALL Tests/Exams/etc.
  • Tips for Requesting Accommodations

ODS recommends that you contact your professors before the start of (or at the beginning of) each semester to discuss your accommodation needs for each class.
Familiarize yourself with each course's syllabus and requirements; proactively address any questions or concerns you may have regarding the provision of your accommodations.
Please remember that you do not need to identify the nature of your disability to your professors; however, many students have found it helpful to discuss their specific learning styles with their professors.

You must schedule EVERY test/quiz/exam you wish to take in ODS via AIM. Requesting accommodations or letters via AIM does NOT schedule your exams in Test Proctoring.

New Students to Receive Accommodations

Before you are able to access an AIM Management System profile, you must complete the registration process and attend the required orientation meeting.

To access the AIM student portal, please click on this link: AIM Student portal. For help, please contact the ODS office.

When a Request Is Denied

When a request for accommodations is denied or not fully approved, the reasons fall into either of these categories:

1. More Information Is Needed

If the decision letter asks for more information, families and schools should work together to gather and submit the missing documentation following UTM Office of Disability Services Policy guidelines. (Remember that the approval process cannot begin until all documentation is received.)

2. Documentation Does Not Support Some or All of the Requested Accommodations

In some cases, documentation may be submitted but may not demonstrate a functional impairment to support the requested accommodations. Your decision letter will explain why requested accommodations were not approved.

If you wish to resubmit your request, you may need to submit different or additional documentation that follows UTM Office of Disability Services Policy guidelines. (Remember that a doctor’s note or an existing IEP or 504 plan may not be sufficient for the requested accommodation to be approved.)

Please note, if you were not approved for an accommodation, simply requesting a different accommodation without providing any additional information will likely not result in immediate approval of your request. For example, requesting a lesser amount of extended time without additional documentation will not change the UTM Office of Disability Services Team decision.

  • Sometimes only part of your request may be approved. This may happen for either of these reasons: ODS has determined that the partial accommodations will be sufficient; or
  • Documentation did not support all the requested accommodations.

If you believe that those approved accommodations will not be sufficient, submit new documentation to the UTM Office of Disability Services to support the need for the denied accommodations. Before resubmitting, however, please take time to consider the approved accommodations.

Reasonable Accommodation Appeal Process

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When a student requests an accommodation or adjustment, academic or otherwise, the ODS will consider the reasonableness of the request.

When the ODS has concerns about the reasonableness of the request, the ODS will assemble a group of trained, knowledgeable, experienced individuals to review the program/course, service, or activity requirements. This group will consider whether effective alternatives to the essential requirements exist, which could allow students with disabilities to participate in programs/courses, services or activities without waiving or lowering essential requirements or fundamentally altering the nature of the program/course, service, or activity. This group shall consist of staff members from the ODS and any applicable university staff.

Within three (3) business days of the date the meeting above has concluded, the ODS will inform the student in writing of whether the request would fundamentally alter the program/course, service, or activity.

If the student is dissatisfied with the result, the student may request, in writing, a review by the Manager of the ODS . The student must provide the written request to the Manager of the ODS within three (3) business days of delivery of the determination. In the written request for review, the student must explain the reasons why s/he believes the determination is in error.

The Manager of the ODS will review and assess the determination. In reaching a decision, the Manager of the ODS may consult with the student or any other individuals who are trained, knowledgeable, and experienced with the program/course, service or activity.

The Manager of the ODS will issue a written decision within three (3) business days of receipt of the student’s request for review.

If the student is dissatisfied with the decision of the Manager of the ODS , the student may file a final appeal The final line of appeal is through the Office of Dr. Mark McCloud (mmcclou5@utm.edu) , Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer.

Please submit appeals in writing with the circumstances and objection clearly outlined.

Accommodations are approved or denied within the Office of Disability Services (731-881-7195). To appeal a denial of accommodation, a student may appeal to the Manager of the Office of Disability services and UT Martin Testing Center. The final line of appeal is through the Office of Dr. Mark McCloud (mmcclou5@utm.edu) , Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer. Please submit appeals in writing with the circumstances and objection clearly outlined.