Join us fortnightly this year as we engage in meaningful conversations about developing materials and interacting with students to integrate High-Impact Practices (HIPs) into our virtual classrooms.

Presenters representing all of the University of Tennessee campuses will contribute to the discussion and share their best practices. The schedule is below. Please register for all sessions you are interested in attending to have it added to your calendar and receive reminders. Registration is available under each topic.

Additionally, there will be an in-person symposium on High Impact Practices on March 24-25, 2022 at Montgomery Bell State Park in Burns, Tennessee. More information about this event will be available later this year, so please check back!

The UT Webinar Series and Symposium on High Impact Practices is a collaboration among all of the University of Tennessee campuses: Chattanooga (UTC), Knoxville (UTK), Martin (UTM) and the University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC). We share the goal of promoting awareness and facilitating discussion and collaboration toward the support of the development of online and hybrid courses that integrate high-impact practices leading to student success. High impact practices are:

  • First Year Seminars
  • Common Intellectual Experiences
  • Learning Communities
  • Writing-Intensive Classes
  • Collaborative Assignments and Projects
  • Undergraduate Research in the Humanities
  • Undergraduate Research in the Sciences
  • Diversity and Global Learning
  • eService Learning
  • Internships
  • Capstone Courses Projects
  • ePortfolios
One UT Grant Logo

For more information about these High Impact Practices, please refer to the book, High-Impact Practices in Online Education, edited by Kathryn E. Linder and Chrysanthemum Mattison Hayes.

Links for the ebook version at each campus are below:

Schedule

First Year Seminars

Monday, October 25 at 3 p.m. (EST) / 2 p.m. (CT) - Registration

This presentation will explore the new Division of Student Success Vol First-Year Experience (VFYE) Initiative. This initiative includes two seminars that connect first-year and first semester transfer students to the UT community. First-Year Seminars are considered a high-impact practice to increase student engagement, student success and encourage welcoming students into a community of scholars. Also, this high impact practice helps students build meaningful relationships with faculty, staff, and other students. The VFYE will expose students to campus resources and create positive early experiences that increase student persistence, retention, and success.

CortneyJo Sandidge

CortneyJo Sandidge, Assistant Vice Provost of the First-Year Experience for the Division of Student Success.

TBA

Wednesday, November 10 at 10 a.m. (EST) / 9 a.m. (CT)

More information coming soon.

 

Recorded Sessions

Capstone Course Projects

Wednesday, February 10 at 10 a.m. (EST) / 9 a.m. (CT) - Recording

Capstone Courses and Projects are well described by Newton-Calvert and Arthur as “involve(ing) the integration of students’ prior learning with an application of that learning, employing a student-centered pedagogy, and resulting in an individual or a group final project.” Bengt Carlson, Experiential Learning Coordinator and Dr. Brad Harris ,Chemical Engineering, will discuss some of the challenges and successes of taking capstones online in the past year, as well as the Experiential Learning endeavor to encourage, support the recognize these types of opportunities.

Bengt Carlson

Bengt Carlson

Bengt Carlson is the Experiential Learning Coordinator at UTC. He worked in a variety of Experiential Learning settings prior to coming to UTC and has helped create an Experiential Learning facilitation and recognition platform over the past 9 years at UTC: www.utc.edu/think/beyond This past summer, Bengt also facilitated two faculty cohorts focused on the Linder and Hayes book, High Impact Practices in Online Education.

Brad Harris

Brad Harris

Dr. Bradley Harris is an Assistant Professor in the Civil and Chemical Engineering Department at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga (UTC). He received his PhD (2014) in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of TN Knoxville. He is the Chemical Hygiene Officer for CECS and the Faculty Advisor for the UTC student chapter of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE). His research interests are in bioengineering: the application of chemical engineering principles to biological problems. He is also passionate about undergraduate research and seeks to maintain a laboratory offering opportunities for chemical engineering students interested in bio-related research. His areas of expertise are biochemistry and cellular and molecular biology, with applications in disease pathogenesis, environmental remediation, and renewable energy. In his current research, Dr. Harris is studying how bacterial pathogens sense and respond to their environment in an effort to improve disease control strategies.

Dr. Harris is also interested in engaging local high school and community college students and local industry professionals in chemical engineering through the development of a remote laboratory. He is actively working to bring online lab stations involving unit operations such as absorption, distillation, heat transfer, fluid flow, and reaction kinetics through the use of Internet of Things (IoT).

Common Intellectual Experiences

Monday, February 22 at 3 p.m. (EST) / 2 p.m. (CT) - Recording

In this session, we will identify how the use of a diversity-themed common reader, adopted in the first-year writing program at UTC, helps to build a foundation for a common intellectual experience for students. Specifically, we will discuss about how adopting a common reader has created consistency in a program that offers multiple sections and how we honor the multiple perspectives and pedagogies that exist within the program and the university.

Jenn Stewart

Jenn Stewart

As Director of Composition at University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, Jenn Stewart researches how writing studies and digital environments influence writing program administration. Her research interests are digital literacies, teaching with technology, and online writing instruction. She is greatly invested in writing program administration, writing center work, and non-tenure track faculty and graduate student professional development and mentoring. In short, she likes to study and talk about teaching, teching, and mentoring.

ePortfolios

Wednesday, March 10 at 10 a.m. (EST) / 9 a.m. (CT) - Recording

In Integrated Studies, we use e-portfolios to document student learning, requiring students to reflect on their integrated degree. As each degree is unique, the students use the e-portfolio to capture how their disciplines work together to formulate a rigorous and specific degree. Dr. Gretchen Potts, Director for Integrated Studies, will detail the process of portfolio development and assessment, including how the online course is designed to engage students and ensure they achieve the program outcomes.

Gretchen Potts

Gretchen E. Potts

Gretchen E. Potts, Ph.D. is UC Foundation Professor of Chemistry at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. She serves as the Co-Director of the School of Professional Studies and the Program Director for the Integrated Studies Program. Dr. Potts earned a BS in Chemistry from Miami University in Oxford, OH in 1996 and a Ph.D. in Analytical Chemistry from the University of Florida in 2000, under the direction of Dr. James Winefordner. Dr. Potts leads an active research program in the Chemistry program, publishing with undergraduate students. Her research interests include analytical spectroscopy, forensic chemistry, environmental analytical chemistry, and bioremediation. In Integrated Studies, Dr. Potts developed the senior capstone course and is responsible for program planning and assessment. Also active on campus and in the community, Dr. Potts has served as the president of the Faculty Senate, a member of the UTC Advisory Board, chair of Faculty Athletics Committee, and a mentor for the Chattanooga Girls Leadership Academy.

Designing and Implementing Collaborative Assignments for Graduate Students

Monday, March 22 at 3 p.m. (EST) / 2 p.m. (CT) - Recording

The challenges and advantages of collaborative assignment design will be presented and discussed. Each of the three presenters will describe specific means of encouraging collaboration among graduate students. Topics will include how to choose an appropriate means of collaboration to meet course objectives; challenges in motivating students to engage in collaborative assignments; and the difficulty in assessing participation in collaborative assignments.

David Dietrich

David Dietrich

David Dietrich is a licensed psychologist who received his Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology from the University of Memphis. Dr. Dietrich has been a faculty member in the UTM counseling program since 2010. Prior to joining UTM, he was a high school counselor for three years, program director for a residential treatment facility for violent juvenile offenders for four years, and psychology professor for 11 years. This diverse professional background reflects his interest in both clinical mental health counseling and school counseling, with a focus on counseling adolescents and young adults. Dr. Dietrich's conference presentations and publications have focused on counselor education and online pedagogy.

Claire Dempsey

Claire Dempsey

Claire Dempsey is a nationally certified counselor who received her Ed.D. in Counseling Education from The University of Memphis. Dr. Dempsey has been a faculty member in the UTM counseling program since 2015. She currently serves as the Clinical Mental Health Practicum and Internship Coordinator. Prior to joining UTM, she worked as a mental health counselor for a hospital on the inpatient mental health, dual diagnosis, and geriatric psychiatric units as well as the hospital’s intensive outpatient hospitalization program (IOP). Dr. Dempsey’s primary research interests include child sexual abuse prevention, coping skills for child sexual abuse survivors, coping strategies and access to qualified counselors for women with fertility roadblocks, online learning and instruction for graduate level courses, and uniting school counseling and mental health counseling professions. Dr. Dempsey has presented on these topics at various conferences and workshops.

Tabitha Cude

Tabitha Cude

Tabitha Cude is a licensed school counselor who received her Ph.D. in Professional Counseling from Amridge University. Prior to this, she received her master’s degree from the UTM counseling program. Dr. Cude has been a faculty member in the UTM counseling program since 2017. She currently serves as the School Counseling Practicum and Internship Coordinator. Prior to joining UTM, she was a school counselor for four years. Dr. Cude’s interests include school counseling, the connection between school counseling and clinical mental health counseling, and online learning and instruction. Her conference presentations have focused on the beneficial link between clinical counseling and school counseling.

Undergraduate Research in Humanities

Wednesday, April 14 at 10 a.m. (EST) / 9 a.m. (CT) - Recording

This program explores the organization and processes used by the Montgomery 1960 Project—an interdisciplinary UG Research team that processed a collection of historical sources and organized the data to maximize student engagement with and educational value of the historical content in game design. Presenters will also share the online resources and innovations developed by the team to overcome the challenges facing undergraduate research teams during COVID.

Cary Staples is a Professor of Design is a founder and creative director of the APP.FARM; a game/app/simulation design studio. The APP Farm allows students + faculty, to come together in a collaborative experience, to analyze and frame content to inspire participants. In addition to winning numerous design awards, Cary has presented her research internationally in a variety of venues including; Design, CHI, Game Design, Language Acquisition, Mathematics and Context + Culture. Current projects involve collaboration with the College of Education (Autistic Learners, Montgomery 1960), Microbiology (Bio remediation) and an NSF grant to develop outreach experiences with Ecology + Evolutionary Biology using VR and game design.

Karen D. Boyd, Ph.D serves as an Associate Professor of Practice and the Undergraduate Education Coordinator in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies at The University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Her research interests include academic and student affairs intersections and historical collegiate exemplars of leadership. Dr. Boyd’s career shows a history of producing innovative, strategic, and transformational student-centered programs, practices, and instruction facilitating supportive and inclusive learning environments, ethical and intercultural maturity, preventative student conduct systems, and personally and socially responsible leadership education. Her scholarship focuses on producing resources so that others may to do the same. Her expertise is grounded in over 25+ years of experiences in student and academic affairs professional positions, faculty appointments, organizational leadership of student affairs professional associations, and faculty governance. Dr Boyd leads the Montgomery 1960 game design interdisciplinary undergraduate research team and curating the College Students Change the World (www.csctw.org), an online archive that seeks to preserve the history of collegiate exemplars of leadership and produce experiential education resources that bring their stories to life.

Internship: What is it? Bridging the gap from classroom to practice

Monday, April 26 at 3 p.m. (EST) / 2 p.m. (CT) - Recording

Field Education involves the transformation of student to intern, and observer to pracitioner. This workshop will explore internship framework, three-way collaboration between intern, internship placement agency, and the Social Work Department. We will further discuss the challenges and advantages of field internships as well as the impact of Covid. I am excited to include in our workshop a current intern and agency supervisor to provide a expanded discussion surrounding internship placements.

Stephanie Allen

Stephanie Allen

My name is Stephanie Lynn Allen and I am a Lecturer and Field Coordinator for the Social Work Program at the University of Tennessee at Martin. My experience prior to coming to UTM in 2015 includes nine years of direct service through Pathways Behavioral Health as a case manager, therapist, and Children and Youth Program Manager. Additionally, I have three years of experience of direct service through Centerstone Behavioral Health as a child and family therapist and crisis counselor with high-risk children in level two and three foster homes. Eight years as a PATH trainer in the Northwest and Southwest region as well as serving for two years as the West Grand Region Program Manager. In regards to my education, I obtained my MSSW at UTK College of Social Work in 2004 and hold a LMSW, and LSSW. I serve on several boards in my community

Collaborative Assignments

Wednesday, May 12 at 10 a.m. (EST) / 9 a.m. (CT) - Recording

In this session, Dr. Jackie Burchum will demonstrate how students in her online pharmacology courses develop infographics for patient teaching. Copies of the assignment, grading rubric, and the peer review follow-up assignment will be shared with attendees.

Writing Intensive Courses

Monday, May 24 at 3 p.m. (EST) / 2 p.m. (CT) - Recording

In this session, Dr. Benjamin Guyer will facilitate discussion about developing effective writing-intensive courses in the Humanities, whether in hybrid, online, or face to face formats. Drawing from assignments and research workshops developed for a range of lower and upper division courses, special emphasis will be placed upon using curricular coherence to develop student skills.

Dr. Ben Guyer

Benjamin M. Guyer is Lecturer in the Department of History and Philosophy at the University of Tennessee at Martin. He is currently pursuing a graduate certificate in Online Teaching & Learning at UT Knoxville.

Service Learning Online

Wednesday, June 9 at 10 a.m. (EST) / 9 a.m. (CT)

Recording

In this seminar, we’ll discuss the impact of COVID in moving courses remotely and lessons learned about conducting service-learning projects in a fully online course. These lessons can be transferred to any fully online service-learning course/project. We will talk through the process of planning the course, contacting partners, Memorandums of Understanding and of Collaboration, and the importance of communication and follow-up among all parties (instructor, partners, and students). Samples of assignments, email templates, and the memorandums will be shared with participants, as well as reflections on successes and challenges that exist online that have not been as prevalent in service learning in the traditional classroom.

Dr. Robin Gray Nicks

Robin Gray Nicks

Robin Gray Nicks, Ph.D. is a Distinguished Lecturer in the Department of English at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville. She incorporates service-learning projects in courses ranging from First-Year Studies to 1-hour University Honors seminars to Public Writing.

Learning Communities and Internships

Monday, August 23 at 3 p.m. (EST) / 2 p.m. (CT) - Recording

The challenges and advantages of teaching in-person internships in an online course will be presented and discussed. The presentation will address specific means of encouraging collaboration and communication between site supervisors, students, and university supervisors; creation of assignments within the internship courses; and supervision by the university supervisor in an online format.

Tabitha Cude

Tabitha Cude

Tabitha Cude is a licensed school counselor who received her Ph.D. in Professional Counseling from Amridge University. Prior to this, she received her master’s degree from the UTM counseling program. Dr. Cude has been a faculty member in the UTM counseling program since 2017. She currently serves as the School Counseling Practicum and Internship Coordinator. Prior to joining UTM, she was a school counselor for four years. Dr. Cude’s interests include school counseling, the connection between school counseling and clinical mental health counseling, and online learning and instruction. Her conference presentations have focused on the beneficial link between clinical counseling and school counseling.

Undergraduate Research in the Humanities

UTC Undergraduate Research Training Opportunity Program Scholars (URTOPS) Experience: A Model to Broaden Undergraduate Research Participation, and Foster Student Success

Wednesday, September 8 at 10 a.m. (EST) / 9 a.m. (CT)

This presentation will explore the newly established UTC URTOPS program, which was developed by the Office for URaCE in collaboration with the Office of Financial Aid & Scholarships to expand research experiences for undergraduates, support faculty research endeavors, and promote student success. Established in 2020, the URTOPS program is a two-semester, work-study apprenticeship designed for students who hold a Federal Work Study award. During the fall semester, program participants engage in research and professional development training, and design a research project under the direction of faculty mentors. Student scholars present research findings at the UTC ReSEARCH Dialogues Conference the following spring. The program targets students without prior research experience, first-generation college students, and students from underrepresented and underserved populations. In this session we will provide an overview of the program structure, describe student research projects and instructional activities, and detail how program directors and faculty mentors adapted and administered the program virtually in response to the ongoing COVID-19 situation.

Lisa Piazza

Lisa Piazza

Dr. Piazza holds a BA in Art History from the University of South Florida, and an MA in Art History from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She holds a Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction, with an emphasis in Higher Education, from the University of South Florida. Dr. Piazza’s research interests include undergraduate research in the arts, and emerging issues in high-impact practices. Prior to joining UTC, Dr. Piazza held the position of Assistant Director for Undergraduate Research at the University of South Florida where she developed a variety of UR programming including the Research in Arts Scholarship, OUR Peer Mentor program, and numerous professional development seminars. Since joining UTC in 2018, she and her team have expanded undergraduate research experiences on campus, and launched several new sponsored programs including a summer REU style experience, a virtual, international research internship, and an UR learning institute. Dr. Piazza is passionate about undergraduate research, and she is committed to broadening UR experiences for all students at UTC regardless of background, discipline, or year of study.


Endia Butler

Tabitha Cude

Endia Butler serves as the Student Employment Coordinator for the Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga (UTC). Endia holds a Bachelor of Arts and Master of Business Administration from UTC. She has been with UTC for 3 years in the Financial Aid Department and teaches one of the First Year Experience Courses. Endia and her husband, Frank, are avid LEGO collectors and enjoy travel.

Undergraduate Research in the Sciences

UTC Undergraduate Research Training Opportunity Program Scholars (URTOPS) Experience: A Model to Broaden Undergraduate Research Participation, and Foster Student Success

Monday, September 20 at 3 p.m. (EST) / 2 p.m. (CT) - Recording

This presentation will explore the newly established UTC URTOPS program, which was developed by the Office for URaCE in collaboration with the Office of Financial Aid & Scholarships to expand research experiences for undergraduates, support faculty research endeavors, and promote student success. Established in 2020, the URTOPS program is a two-semester, work-study apprenticeship designed for students who hold a Federal Work Study award. During the fall semester, program participants engage in research and professional development training, and design a research project under the direction of faculty mentors. Student scholars present research findings at the UTC ReSEARCH Dialogues Conference the following spring. The program targets students without prior research experience, first-generation college students, and students from underrepresented and underserved populations. In this session we will provide an overview of the program structure, describe student research projects and instructional activities, and detail how program directors and faculty mentors adapted and administered the program virtually in response to the ongoing COVID-19 situation.

Lisa Piazza

Lisa Piazza

Dr. Piazza holds a BA in Art History from the University of South Florida, and an MA in Art History from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She holds a Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction, with an emphasis in Higher Education, from the University of South Florida. Dr. Piazza’s research interests include undergraduate research in the arts, and emerging issues in high-impact practices. Prior to joining UTC, Dr. Piazza held the position of Assistant Director for Undergraduate Research at the University of South Florida where she developed a variety of UR programming including the Research in Arts Scholarship, OUR Peer Mentor program, and numerous professional development seminars. Since joining UTC in 2018, she and her team have expanded undergraduate research experiences on campus, and launched several new sponsored programs including a summer REU style experience, a virtual, international research internship, and an UR learning institute. Dr. Piazza is passionate about undergraduate research, and she is committed to broadening UR experiences for all students at UTC regardless of background, discipline, or year of study.


Endia Butler

Tabitha Cude

Endia Butler serves as the Student Employment Coordinator for the Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga (UTC). Endia holds a Bachelor of Arts and Master of Business Administration from UTC. She has been with UTC for 3 years in the Financial Aid Department and teaches one of the First Year Experience Courses. Endia and her husband, Frank, are avid LEGO collectors and enjoy travel.

Learning Communities at UTC

Wednesday, October 13 at 10 a.m. (EST) / 9 a.m. (CT)

Research has made it clear: students living on campus demonstrate overall higher levels of academic success and the participation of those students in intentional living learning communities (LLCs) simply intensifies this positive effect. Two administrators from the University of Tennessee Chattanooga, Dr. Linda Frost, Dean of the Honors College, and Jaclyn Wooten-York, Assistant Director of the Decosimo Success Center and Program Director of the Rollins Scholars Program, reflect on the things they have found most successful within their LLCs as well as what they would love to improve. Adding to the conversation will be participants from each of these LLCs: Rachel Emond, Honors College alumna and former Resident Assistant, and Harrison Davis, third-year student and Resident Assistant for Rollins Scholars. Join us to hear and share what works and what doesn’t with living learning communities.

Dr. Linda Frost

Dr. Linda Frost

Linda Frost is a Professor in the English Department at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga but came to UTC as the founding Dean of the UTC Honors College in 2013. She’s a published researcher in American literature and culture, but her primary work for over 15 years now has been in honors education. Prior to coming to Chattanooga, she was the Associate Director of the University Honors Program at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and then Director of the Honors Program at Eastern Kentucky University. She has served as a member of the Board of Directors of the National Collegiate Honors Council, is co-chair of the NCHC Publications Board, and was the 2019 recipient of the Sam Schuman Award, a national recognition for excellence in honors at a four-year institution. She is the author of Housing Honors, a 2015 collection of essays about honors buildings and spaces, as well as other essays regarding honors education. A member of the first living learning community at her own alma mater, Bowling Green State University in Ohio, Frost is the mother of two college-going children, both of whom are happily seated in honors programs and LLCs of their own.


Jaclyn Wooten-York

Jaclyn Wooten-York

Jaclyn York is the Assistant Director of the Decosimo Success Center at the Rollins College of Business at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga and has served in roles of progressing responsibility since 2013. Jaclyn has worked with Living Learning Communities since 2014 and created what is now the Rollins Scholars Residential Program. Prior to working at UTC, she was employed in the financial services industry at CitiGroup where she held security and commodity licenses. In her undergraduate studies, Jaclyn was a Political Science major and member of the UTC Women’s Tennis Team. Jaclyn enjoys hiking with her husband, Shannon, and their Border Collie, Sierra, in the Chattanooga area and beyond.

 

Campus Representatives

Jennifer Gramling, PhD

Director of Online Programs
UT Knoxville
jgramlin@utk.edu
865-974-0655

Jean A. Derco, EdD

Executive Director, Office of Information Technology
UT Knoxville
jderco@utk.edu
865-974-9551

Thomas Laughner, PhD

Director of the Teaching and Learning Center
UT Health Science Center
tlaughne@uthsc.edu
901-448-1218

Mary Marr

Senior Instructional Developer
UT Chattanooga
Mary-Marr@utc.edu
423-425-5677

Adam Wilson, PhD

Director of Online Programs
UT Martin
awilson9@utm.edu
731-881-7959